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The influence of hydrogenation and oxygen vacancies on molybdenum oxides work function and gap states for application in organic optoelectronics

The influence of hydrogenation and oxygen vacancies on molybdenum oxides work function and gap states for application in organic optoelectronics
The influence of hydrogenation and oxygen vacancies on molybdenum oxides work function and gap states for application in organic optoelectronics

Molybdenum oxide is used as a low-resistance anode interfacial layer in applications such as organic light emitting diodes and organic photovoltaics. However, little is known about the correlation between its stoichiometry and electronic properties, such as work function and occupied gap states. In addition, despite the fact that the knowledge of the exact oxide stoichiometry is of paramount importance, few studies have appeared in the literature discussing how this stoichiometry can be controlled to permit the desirable modification of the oxide's electronic structure. This work aims to investigate the beneficial role of hydrogenation (the incorporation of hydrogen within the oxide lattice) versus oxygen vacancy formation in tuning the electronic structure of molybdenum oxides while maintaining their high work function. A large improvement in the operational characteristics of both polymer light emitting devices and bulk heterojunction solar cells incorporating hydrogenated Mo oxides as hole injection/extraction layers was achieved as a result of favorable energy level alignment at the metal oxide/organic interface and enhanced charge transport through the formation of a large density of gap states near the Fermi level.

0002-7863
16178-16187
Vasilopoulou, Maria
aad1381e-d091-4090-8c7c-b74bed22393d
Douvas, Antonios M.
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Georgiadou, Dimitra G.
84977176-3678-4fb3-a3dd-2044a49c853b
Palilis, Leonidas C.
b09e9554-54da-4be5-aa08-bda894e2b86f
Kennou, Stella
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Sygellou, Labrini
87e6de58-e0d8-46b1-aaa9-0d2150379562
Soultati, Anastasia
75205fde-50fc-473e-ad72-ab0b3c6b2cb9
Kostis, Ioannis
681af9a6-5162-4f35-b6b1-365ea7ce7e47
Papadimitropoulos, Giorgos
b4f1ecba-cc8a-4882-99a5-a29354a9bca7
Davazoglou, Dimitris
a946cf5d-287a-4734-ba55-b180ab4525ed
Argitis, Panagiotis
ab9c4ea6-3dd2-4e34-935d-81bfb360f358
Vasilopoulou, Maria
aad1381e-d091-4090-8c7c-b74bed22393d
Douvas, Antonios M.
2e088659-e1b3-4723-aff9-4dfe385579b5
Georgiadou, Dimitra G.
84977176-3678-4fb3-a3dd-2044a49c853b
Palilis, Leonidas C.
b09e9554-54da-4be5-aa08-bda894e2b86f
Kennou, Stella
7ca6a6bd-6a05-4110-b3da-c8807f798370
Sygellou, Labrini
87e6de58-e0d8-46b1-aaa9-0d2150379562
Soultati, Anastasia
75205fde-50fc-473e-ad72-ab0b3c6b2cb9
Kostis, Ioannis
681af9a6-5162-4f35-b6b1-365ea7ce7e47
Papadimitropoulos, Giorgos
b4f1ecba-cc8a-4882-99a5-a29354a9bca7
Davazoglou, Dimitris
a946cf5d-287a-4734-ba55-b180ab4525ed
Argitis, Panagiotis
ab9c4ea6-3dd2-4e34-935d-81bfb360f358

Vasilopoulou, Maria, Douvas, Antonios M., Georgiadou, Dimitra G., Palilis, Leonidas C., Kennou, Stella, Sygellou, Labrini, Soultati, Anastasia, Kostis, Ioannis, Papadimitropoulos, Giorgos, Davazoglou, Dimitris and Argitis, Panagiotis (2012) The influence of hydrogenation and oxygen vacancies on molybdenum oxides work function and gap states for application in organic optoelectronics. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 134 (39), 16178-16187. (doi:10.1021/ja3026906).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Molybdenum oxide is used as a low-resistance anode interfacial layer in applications such as organic light emitting diodes and organic photovoltaics. However, little is known about the correlation between its stoichiometry and electronic properties, such as work function and occupied gap states. In addition, despite the fact that the knowledge of the exact oxide stoichiometry is of paramount importance, few studies have appeared in the literature discussing how this stoichiometry can be controlled to permit the desirable modification of the oxide's electronic structure. This work aims to investigate the beneficial role of hydrogenation (the incorporation of hydrogen within the oxide lattice) versus oxygen vacancy formation in tuning the electronic structure of molybdenum oxides while maintaining their high work function. A large improvement in the operational characteristics of both polymer light emitting devices and bulk heterojunction solar cells incorporating hydrogenated Mo oxides as hole injection/extraction layers was achieved as a result of favorable energy level alignment at the metal oxide/organic interface and enhanced charge transport through the formation of a large density of gap states near the Fermi level.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 31 August 2012
Published date: 3 October 2012

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 440497
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/440497
ISSN: 0002-7863
PURE UUID: b159c7a4-f0bf-477f-b485-cd78c8961958
ORCID for Dimitra G. Georgiadou: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2620-3346

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Date deposited: 05 May 2020 16:42
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 02:27

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Contributors

Author: Maria Vasilopoulou
Author: Antonios M. Douvas
Author: Leonidas C. Palilis
Author: Stella Kennou
Author: Labrini Sygellou
Author: Anastasia Soultati
Author: Ioannis Kostis
Author: Giorgos Papadimitropoulos
Author: Dimitris Davazoglou
Author: Panagiotis Argitis

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