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Spatio-temporal genetic tagging of a cosmopolitan planktivorous shark provides insight to gene flow, temporal variation and site-specific re-encounters

Spatio-temporal genetic tagging of a cosmopolitan planktivorous shark provides insight to gene flow, temporal variation and site-specific re-encounters
Spatio-temporal genetic tagging of a cosmopolitan planktivorous shark provides insight to gene flow, temporal variation and site-specific re-encounters
Migratory movements in response to seasonal resources often influence population structure and dynamics. Yet in mobile marine predators, population genetic consequences of such repetitious behaviour remain inaccessible without comprehensive sampling strategies. Temporal genetic sampling of seasonally recurring aggregations of planktivorous basking sharks, Cetorhinus maximus, in the Northeast Atlantic (NEA) affords an opportunity to resolve individual re-encounters at key sites with population connectivity and patterns of relatedness. Genetic tagging (19 microsatellites) revealed 18% of re-sampled individuals in the NEA demonstrated inter/multi-annual site-specific re-encounters. High genetic connectivity and migration between aggregation sites indicate the Irish Sea as an important movement corridor, with a contemporary effective population estimate (Ne) of 382 (CI = 241–830). We contrast the prevailing view of high gene flow across oceanic regions with evidence of population structure within the NEA, with early-season sharks off southwest Ireland possibly representing genetically distinct migrants. Finally, we found basking sharks surfacing together in the NEA are on average more related than expected by chance, suggesting a genetic consequence of, or a potential mechanism maintaining, site-specific re-encounters. Long-term temporal genetic monitoring is paramount in determining future viability of cosmopolitan marine species, identifying genetic units for conservation management, and for understanding aggregation structure and dynamics.
2045-2322
1-17
Lieber, Lilian
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Hall, Graham
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Hall, Jackie
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Berrow, Simon
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Johnston, Emmett
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Gubili, Chrysoula
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Sarginson, Jane
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Francis, Malcolm
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Duffy, Clinton
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Wintner, Sabine P.
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Doherty, Philip D.
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Godley, Brendan J.
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Hawkes, Lucy A.
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Witt, Matthew J.
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Henderson, Suzanne M.
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De Sabata, Eleonora
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Shivji, Mahmood S.
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Dawson, Deborah A.
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Sims, David W.
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Jones, Catherine S.
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Noble, Leslie R.
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Lieber, Lilian
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Hall, Graham
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Hall, Jackie
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Berrow, Simon
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Johnston, Emmett
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Gubili, Chrysoula
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Sarginson, Jane
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Francis, Malcolm
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Duffy, Clinton
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Wintner, Sabine P.
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Doherty, Philip D.
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Godley, Brendan J.
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Hawkes, Lucy A.
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Witt, Matthew J.
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Henderson, Suzanne M.
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De Sabata, Eleonora
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Shivji, Mahmood S.
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Dawson, Deborah A.
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Sims, David W.
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Jones, Catherine S.
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Noble, Leslie R.
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Lieber, Lilian, Hall, Graham, Hall, Jackie, Berrow, Simon, Johnston, Emmett, Gubili, Chrysoula, Sarginson, Jane, Francis, Malcolm, Duffy, Clinton, Wintner, Sabine P., Doherty, Philip D., Godley, Brendan J., Hawkes, Lucy A., Witt, Matthew J., Henderson, Suzanne M., De Sabata, Eleonora, Shivji, Mahmood S., Dawson, Deborah A., Sims, David W., Jones, Catherine S. and Noble, Leslie R. (2020) Spatio-temporal genetic tagging of a cosmopolitan planktivorous shark provides insight to gene flow, temporal variation and site-specific re-encounters. Scientific Reports, 10 (1), 1-17, [1661]. (doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58086-4).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Migratory movements in response to seasonal resources often influence population structure and dynamics. Yet in mobile marine predators, population genetic consequences of such repetitious behaviour remain inaccessible without comprehensive sampling strategies. Temporal genetic sampling of seasonally recurring aggregations of planktivorous basking sharks, Cetorhinus maximus, in the Northeast Atlantic (NEA) affords an opportunity to resolve individual re-encounters at key sites with population connectivity and patterns of relatedness. Genetic tagging (19 microsatellites) revealed 18% of re-sampled individuals in the NEA demonstrated inter/multi-annual site-specific re-encounters. High genetic connectivity and migration between aggregation sites indicate the Irish Sea as an important movement corridor, with a contemporary effective population estimate (Ne) of 382 (CI = 241–830). We contrast the prevailing view of high gene flow across oceanic regions with evidence of population structure within the NEA, with early-season sharks off southwest Ireland possibly representing genetically distinct migrants. Finally, we found basking sharks surfacing together in the NEA are on average more related than expected by chance, suggesting a genetic consequence of, or a potential mechanism maintaining, site-specific re-encounters. Long-term temporal genetic monitoring is paramount in determining future viability of cosmopolitan marine species, identifying genetic units for conservation management, and for understanding aggregation structure and dynamics.

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s41598-020-58086-4 - Version of Record
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Accepted/In Press date: 29 December 2019
Published date: 3 February 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 440538
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/440538
ISSN: 2045-2322
PURE UUID: 3d58abd9-3a5d-44fe-bee6-50b73ca6f71a

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Date deposited: 07 May 2020 16:30
Last modified: 25 Nov 2021 23:02

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Contributors

Author: Lilian Lieber
Author: Graham Hall
Author: Jackie Hall
Author: Simon Berrow
Author: Emmett Johnston
Author: Chrysoula Gubili
Author: Jane Sarginson
Author: Malcolm Francis
Author: Clinton Duffy
Author: Sabine P. Wintner
Author: Philip D. Doherty
Author: Brendan J. Godley
Author: Lucy A. Hawkes
Author: Matthew J. Witt
Author: Suzanne M. Henderson
Author: Eleonora De Sabata
Author: Mahmood S. Shivji
Author: Deborah A. Dawson
Author: David W. Sims
Author: Catherine S. Jones
Author: Leslie R. Noble

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