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Rising to challenges in assessment and feedback in HCI education: A-peer-supported approach

Rising to challenges in assessment and feedback in HCI education: A-peer-supported approach
Rising to challenges in assessment and feedback in HCI education: A-peer-supported approach
Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is a research area which studies how people interact with computer systems. Because of its multidisciplinary nature, HCI modules often sit at unease within the computer science curriculum which is primarily composed by modules typically assessed through objective measures, using quantitative methods. Assessment criteria of HCI topics need to make some subjective measures quantifiable (e.g. aesthetics and creativity). In the case of large classes, it is critical that the assessment can scale appropriately without compromising on the validity of the judgment of how well the learning outcomes have been achieved. In this seminar talk Adriana will focus on her experiences in redesigning the assessment of an undergraduate module on HCI, taking into account increasingly larger classes. Redesign decisions needed to preserve the validity and reliability of the assessment whilst respecting the need for timely feedback. Adriana will explain how learning activities in the module were aligned to the assessment. This included the use of PeerWise for student-authored MCQs, and the use of video to foster creativity and application of knowledge. The combination of these helped leveraging the power of peer interaction for learning.
Wilde, Adriana
4f9174fe-482a-4114-8e81-79b835946224
Wilde, Adriana
4f9174fe-482a-4114-8e81-79b835946224

Wilde, Adriana (2019) Rising to challenges in assessment and feedback in HCI education: A-peer-supported approach. WAIS Research Seminar, United States. 17 Oct 2019.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)

Abstract

Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is a research area which studies how people interact with computer systems. Because of its multidisciplinary nature, HCI modules often sit at unease within the computer science curriculum which is primarily composed by modules typically assessed through objective measures, using quantitative methods. Assessment criteria of HCI topics need to make some subjective measures quantifiable (e.g. aesthetics and creativity). In the case of large classes, it is critical that the assessment can scale appropriately without compromising on the validity of the judgment of how well the learning outcomes have been achieved. In this seminar talk Adriana will focus on her experiences in redesigning the assessment of an undergraduate module on HCI, taking into account increasingly larger classes. Redesign decisions needed to preserve the validity and reliability of the assessment whilst respecting the need for timely feedback. Adriana will explain how learning activities in the module were aligned to the assessment. This included the use of PeerWise for student-authored MCQs, and the use of video to foster creativity and application of knowledge. The combination of these helped leveraging the power of peer interaction for learning.

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More information

Published date: 17 October 2019
Venue - Dates: WAIS Research Seminar, United States, 2019-10-17 - 2019-10-17

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 440608
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/440608
PURE UUID: 7fadca79-3b62-4e21-98ba-007fe612cbd4

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Date deposited: 12 May 2020 16:32
Last modified: 12 May 2020 16:32

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