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Time-lapse imaging using 3D ultra-high-frequency marine seismic reflection data

Time-lapse imaging using 3D ultra-high-frequency marine seismic reflection data
Time-lapse imaging using 3D ultra-high-frequency marine seismic reflection data

Time-lapse (4D) seismic imaging is now widely used as a tool to map and interpret changes in deep reservoirs as well as investigate dynamic, shallow hydrological processes in the near surface. However, there are very few examples of time-lapse analysis using ultra-high-frequency (UHF; kHz range) marine seismic reflection data. Exacting requirements for navigation can be prohibitive for acquiring coherent, true-3D volumes. Variable environmental noise can also lead to poor amplitude repeatability and make it difficult to identify differences that are related to real physical changes. Overcoming these challenges opens up a range of potential applications for monitoring the subsurface at decimetric resolution, including geohazards, geologic structures, as well as the bed-level and subsurface response to anthropogenic activities. Navigation postprocessing was incorporated to improve the acquisition and processing workflow for the 3D Chirp subbottom profiler and provide stable, centimeter-level absolute positioning, resulting in well-matched 3D data and mitigating 4D noise for data stacked into 25×25 cm common-midpoint bins. Within an example 4D data set acquired on the south coast of the UK, interpretable differences are recorded within a shallow gas blanket. Reflections from the top and bottom of a gas pocket are imaged at low tide, whereas at high tide only the upper reflection is imaged. This case study demonstrates the viability of time-lapse UHF 3D seismic reflection for quantitative mapping of decimeter-scale changes within the shallow marine subsurface.

4D, acquisition, high-resolution, navigation, time-lapse
0016-8033
P13-P25
Faggetter, Michael J.
3aa02272-6072-4748-96ec-2e9c28362daf
Vardy, Mark E.
8dd019dc-e57d-4b49-8f23-0fa6d246e69d
Dix, Justin K.
efbb0b6e-7dfd-47e1-ae96-92412bd45628
Bull, Jonathan M.
974037fd-544b-458f-98cc-ce8eca89e3c8
Henstock, Timothy J.
27c450a4-3e6b-41f8-97f9-4e0e181400bb
Faggetter, Michael J.
3aa02272-6072-4748-96ec-2e9c28362daf
Vardy, Mark E.
8dd019dc-e57d-4b49-8f23-0fa6d246e69d
Dix, Justin K.
efbb0b6e-7dfd-47e1-ae96-92412bd45628
Bull, Jonathan M.
974037fd-544b-458f-98cc-ce8eca89e3c8
Henstock, Timothy J.
27c450a4-3e6b-41f8-97f9-4e0e181400bb

Faggetter, Michael J., Vardy, Mark E., Dix, Justin K., Bull, Jonathan M. and Henstock, Timothy J. (2020) Time-lapse imaging using 3D ultra-high-frequency marine seismic reflection data. Geophysics, 85 (2), P13-P25. (doi:10.1190/geo2019-0258.1).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Time-lapse (4D) seismic imaging is now widely used as a tool to map and interpret changes in deep reservoirs as well as investigate dynamic, shallow hydrological processes in the near surface. However, there are very few examples of time-lapse analysis using ultra-high-frequency (UHF; kHz range) marine seismic reflection data. Exacting requirements for navigation can be prohibitive for acquiring coherent, true-3D volumes. Variable environmental noise can also lead to poor amplitude repeatability and make it difficult to identify differences that are related to real physical changes. Overcoming these challenges opens up a range of potential applications for monitoring the subsurface at decimetric resolution, including geohazards, geologic structures, as well as the bed-level and subsurface response to anthropogenic activities. Navigation postprocessing was incorporated to improve the acquisition and processing workflow for the 3D Chirp subbottom profiler and provide stable, centimeter-level absolute positioning, resulting in well-matched 3D data and mitigating 4D noise for data stacked into 25×25 cm common-midpoint bins. Within an example 4D data set acquired on the south coast of the UK, interpretable differences are recorded within a shallow gas blanket. Reflections from the top and bottom of a gas pocket are imaged at low tide, whereas at high tide only the upper reflection is imaged. This case study demonstrates the viability of time-lapse UHF 3D seismic reflection for quantitative mapping of decimeter-scale changes within the shallow marine subsurface.

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Faggetter_et_al_2020_Geophysics_final_revised (2) - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 5 December 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 February 2020
Published date: 1 March 2020
Additional Information: Funding Information: This work was funded in part by SAND Geophysics, the University of Southampton, and Kongsberg GeoAcoustics Ltd. The authors would like to thank both TerraPos and Kongsberg Seatex for their help and technical support regarding the acquisition and processing of RTK-GPS data, as well as the Channel Coastal Observatory for facilitating the laser measurements of the 3D Chirp. We are also grateful to three reviewers whose contributions greatly helped to improve the quality of the manuscript. In this case study, 3D seismic volumes were generated with in-house QSI-3D software. All other seismic processing was performed using custom algorithms written by M. J. Faggetter. Publisher Copyright: © 2020 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.
Keywords: 4D, acquisition, high-resolution, navigation, time-lapse

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 440618
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/440618
ISSN: 0016-8033
PURE UUID: 9e46e70e-a4bf-4cf1-8905-6a210416ad72
ORCID for Jonathan M. Bull: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3373-5807
ORCID for Timothy J. Henstock: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2132-2514

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Date deposited: 12 May 2020 16:44
Last modified: 28 Sep 2022 01:36

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Contributors

Author: Michael J. Faggetter
Author: Mark E. Vardy
Author: Justin K. Dix

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