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Diaspora incorporation mechanisms: sustained and episodic mobilisation among the British-Egyptian diaspora after the Arab Spring

Diaspora incorporation mechanisms: sustained and episodic mobilisation among the British-Egyptian diaspora after the Arab Spring
Diaspora incorporation mechanisms: sustained and episodic mobilisation among the British-Egyptian diaspora after the Arab Spring

Previous literature on diasporas assert that political crises such as revolutions in home states work as pressuring devices which activate diasporas, alongside political opportunity structures (POS) present in host countries, as an explanation for mobilisation. However, this does not sufficiently explain why two diaspora groups from the same country of origin mobilise in a sustained or episodic manner. Through interviews this paper will focus on the two core Egyptian diaspora groups in the United Kingdom (UK) since 2011–the sustained mobilisation of the Egyptian Revolutionary Council (ERC), and the episodic mobilisation of the Egyptian National Association for Change (ENAC). It argues that the availability of specific incorporation mechanisms such as movement diffusion and the (non) -existence of elite proximity in host states incorporate or disincorporate a group, leading to sustained or episodic mobilisation. It contributes to emerging literature on contentious diaspora politics with these two added variables.

Arab Spring, British foreign policy, Diaspora mobilisation, Egyptian diaspora, opportunity structures
1369-183X
Kennedy, Gillian
3d1ab920-6986-41f5-8d25-653e793baf92
Kennedy, Gillian
3d1ab920-6986-41f5-8d25-653e793baf92

Kennedy, Gillian (2019) Diaspora incorporation mechanisms: sustained and episodic mobilisation among the British-Egyptian diaspora after the Arab Spring. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies. (doi:10.1080/1369183X.2019.1693887).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Previous literature on diasporas assert that political crises such as revolutions in home states work as pressuring devices which activate diasporas, alongside political opportunity structures (POS) present in host countries, as an explanation for mobilisation. However, this does not sufficiently explain why two diaspora groups from the same country of origin mobilise in a sustained or episodic manner. Through interviews this paper will focus on the two core Egyptian diaspora groups in the United Kingdom (UK) since 2011–the sustained mobilisation of the Egyptian Revolutionary Council (ERC), and the episodic mobilisation of the Egyptian National Association for Change (ENAC). It argues that the availability of specific incorporation mechanisms such as movement diffusion and the (non) -existence of elite proximity in host states incorporate or disincorporate a group, leading to sustained or episodic mobilisation. It contributes to emerging literature on contentious diaspora politics with these two added variables.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 12 November 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 November 2019
Keywords: Arab Spring, British foreign policy, Diaspora mobilisation, Egyptian diaspora, opportunity structures

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 440664
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/440664
ISSN: 1369-183X
PURE UUID: 2e4095d0-f750-490c-ac50-e8593b40d866

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 May 2020 16:33
Last modified: 11 Mar 2021 17:30

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