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The public remain uninformed and wary of climate engineering

The public remain uninformed and wary of climate engineering
The public remain uninformed and wary of climate engineering
International CO2 emissions reduction commitments are insufficient to avert damaging global warming and imperil a sustainable future. Climate engineering approaches are increasingly proposed as near-term intervention strategies, but deployment of these controversial techniques will require careful engagement with and the support of the public. New quantitative measurements of public perceptions for six climate engineering approaches show that the public of the United Kingdom (UK), United States (US), Australia (AU) and New Zealand (NZ) continue to have little knowledge of climate engineering. All approaches are regarded unfavourably, albeit less so for carbon dioxide removal (CDR) than solar radiation management (SRM). Knowledge and perceptions are remarkably similar between countries although UK and US respondents are more favourable towards SRM and UK respondents are more favourable towards CDR. Stratospheric aerosol injection is the most negatively perceived approach. Support for small-scale trials is also higher for CDR approaches than SRM. Statistical analyses yield mixed relationships between perceptions of climate engineering and age, political affiliation and pro-ecological views. Thus far, attempts to engage the public with climate engineering have seen little change over time and consequently, there is growing urgency to facilitate careful citizen deliberation using objective and instructive information about climate engineering.
Climate engineering, Cross-country, Framing effects, Geoengineering, Public engagement
0165-0009
303-322
Carlisle, Daniel P.
adcd4f01-867a-42e1-8e2b-189602dff1fb
Feetham, Pamela M.
10e40704-ea2a-4ea7-8890-d9fe7076baad
Wright, Malcolm J.
b91319a5-5906-4824-8a9a-b7dba3654d3e
Teagle, Damon A. H.
396539c5-acbe-4dfa-bb9b-94af878fe286
Carlisle, Daniel P.
adcd4f01-867a-42e1-8e2b-189602dff1fb
Feetham, Pamela M.
10e40704-ea2a-4ea7-8890-d9fe7076baad
Wright, Malcolm J.
b91319a5-5906-4824-8a9a-b7dba3654d3e
Teagle, Damon A. H.
396539c5-acbe-4dfa-bb9b-94af878fe286

Carlisle, Daniel P., Feetham, Pamela M., Wright, Malcolm J. and Teagle, Damon A. H. (2020) The public remain uninformed and wary of climate engineering. Climatic Change, 160 (2), 303-322. (doi:10.1007/s10584-020-02706-5).

Record type: Article

Abstract

International CO2 emissions reduction commitments are insufficient to avert damaging global warming and imperil a sustainable future. Climate engineering approaches are increasingly proposed as near-term intervention strategies, but deployment of these controversial techniques will require careful engagement with and the support of the public. New quantitative measurements of public perceptions for six climate engineering approaches show that the public of the United Kingdom (UK), United States (US), Australia (AU) and New Zealand (NZ) continue to have little knowledge of climate engineering. All approaches are regarded unfavourably, albeit less so for carbon dioxide removal (CDR) than solar radiation management (SRM). Knowledge and perceptions are remarkably similar between countries although UK and US respondents are more favourable towards SRM and UK respondents are more favourable towards CDR. Stratospheric aerosol injection is the most negatively perceived approach. Support for small-scale trials is also higher for CDR approaches than SRM. Statistical analyses yield mixed relationships between perceptions of climate engineering and age, political affiliation and pro-ecological views. Thus far, attempts to engage the public with climate engineering have seen little change over time and consequently, there is growing urgency to facilitate careful citizen deliberation using objective and instructive information about climate engineering.

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Thepublic remain uninformed - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 19 March 2020
Published date: 12 April 2020
Keywords: Climate engineering, Cross-country, Framing effects, Geoengineering, Public engagement

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 440717
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/440717
ISSN: 0165-0009
PURE UUID: ad9a0c97-6723-45ef-8e6b-39342d64cf29
ORCID for Damon A. H. Teagle: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4416-8409

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 May 2020 16:31
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 06:15

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Contributors

Author: Daniel P. Carlisle
Author: Pamela M. Feetham
Author: Malcolm J. Wright

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