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Association between inflammatory potential of diet and risk of depression in middle-aged women: the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health

Association between inflammatory potential of diet and risk of depression in middle-aged women: the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health
Association between inflammatory potential of diet and risk of depression in middle-aged women: the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health

Dietary factors and inflammation markers have been shown to play a role in the development of depression. However, there are very few studies that have explored the association between inflammatory potential of diet and risk of depression. In this study, we examined the association between the dietary inflammatory index (DII), which was developed specifically to measure the inflammatory potential of diet, and risk of depression in the middle-aged cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. A total of 6438 women with a mean age of 52·0 (sd 1·4) years at baseline were followed-up at five surveys over 12 years (2001-2013). Depression was defined as a score of ≥10 on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression-10 scale. The DII score, a literature-derived, population-based dietary index that has been validated against several inflammatory markers, was computed on the basis of dietary intake assessed using a validated FFQ. Generalised estimating equations were used to estimate relative risk (RR) of depression according to DII score. Models were adjusted for energy intake, highest education completed, marital status, menopause status and symptoms, personal illness or injury, smoking status, physical activity, BMI and depression diagnosis or treatment. In total, 1156 women (18 %) had scores≥10 on the CESD scale over the course of 9 years. Women with the most anti-inflammatory diet had an approximately 20 % lower risk of developing depression compared with women with the most pro-inflammatory diet (RRDII quartile 1 v. 4: 0·81; 95 % CI 0·69, 0·96; P trend=0·03). These results suggest that an anti-inflammatory diet is associated with lower risk of depression in middle-aged Australian women.

Australia, Depression/etiology, Diet/adverse effects, Diet Surveys, Female, Food/classification, Humans, Inflammation/etiology, Longitudinal Studies, Middle Aged
0007-1145
1077-86
Shivappa, Nitin
1c0b527d-0366-4fb6-9e7d-1342b2009e8f
Schoenaker, Danielle A.J.M.
84b96b87-4070-45a5-9777-5a1e4e45e818
Hebert, James R.
486a9a8e-77ff-4dec-a74d-bbf8d1d55728
Mishra, Gita D.
02143b82-e536-4915-9b30-3c86cbe1a1fe
Shivappa, Nitin
1c0b527d-0366-4fb6-9e7d-1342b2009e8f
Schoenaker, Danielle A.J.M.
84b96b87-4070-45a5-9777-5a1e4e45e818
Hebert, James R.
486a9a8e-77ff-4dec-a74d-bbf8d1d55728
Mishra, Gita D.
02143b82-e536-4915-9b30-3c86cbe1a1fe

Shivappa, Nitin, Schoenaker, Danielle A.J.M., Hebert, James R. and Mishra, Gita D. (2016) Association between inflammatory potential of diet and risk of depression in middle-aged women: the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. British Journal of Nutrition, 116 (6), 1077-86. (doi:10.1017/S0007114516002853).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Dietary factors and inflammation markers have been shown to play a role in the development of depression. However, there are very few studies that have explored the association between inflammatory potential of diet and risk of depression. In this study, we examined the association between the dietary inflammatory index (DII), which was developed specifically to measure the inflammatory potential of diet, and risk of depression in the middle-aged cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. A total of 6438 women with a mean age of 52·0 (sd 1·4) years at baseline were followed-up at five surveys over 12 years (2001-2013). Depression was defined as a score of ≥10 on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression-10 scale. The DII score, a literature-derived, population-based dietary index that has been validated against several inflammatory markers, was computed on the basis of dietary intake assessed using a validated FFQ. Generalised estimating equations were used to estimate relative risk (RR) of depression according to DII score. Models were adjusted for energy intake, highest education completed, marital status, menopause status and symptoms, personal illness or injury, smoking status, physical activity, BMI and depression diagnosis or treatment. In total, 1156 women (18 %) had scores≥10 on the CESD scale over the course of 9 years. Women with the most anti-inflammatory diet had an approximately 20 % lower risk of developing depression compared with women with the most pro-inflammatory diet (RRDII quartile 1 v. 4: 0·81; 95 % CI 0·69, 0·96; P trend=0·03). These results suggest that an anti-inflammatory diet is associated with lower risk of depression in middle-aged Australian women.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 28 June 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 8 August 2016
Published date: 28 September 2016
Keywords: Australia, Depression/etiology, Diet/adverse effects, Diet Surveys, Female, Food/classification, Humans, Inflammation/etiology, Longitudinal Studies, Middle Aged

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 441198
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/441198
ISSN: 0007-1145
PURE UUID: e00e5d0e-489a-4df3-9be6-8638198c45be
ORCID for Danielle A.J.M. Schoenaker: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7652-990X

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Date deposited: 04 Jun 2020 16:31
Last modified: 02 Dec 2022 03:00

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Contributors

Author: Nitin Shivappa
Author: James R. Hebert
Author: Gita D. Mishra

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