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A pro-inflammatory diet is associated with increased risk of developing hypertension among middle-aged women

A pro-inflammatory diet is associated with increased risk of developing hypertension among middle-aged women
A pro-inflammatory diet is associated with increased risk of developing hypertension among middle-aged women

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: A pro-inflammatory diet is thought to lead to hypertension through oxidative stress and vessel wall inflammation. We therefore investigated the association between the dietary inflammatory index (DII) and developing hypertension in a population-based cohort of middle-aged women.

METHODS AND RESULTS: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health included 7169 Australian women, aged 52 years (SD 1 year) at baseline in 2001, who were followed up through 4 surveys until 2013. The DII, a literature-derived dietary index that has been validated against several inflammatory markers, was calculated based on data collected via a validated food-frequency questionnaire administered at baseline. Hypertension was defined as new onset of doctor-diagnosed hypertension, ascertained through self-report between 2001 and 2013. Generalised Estimating Equation analyses were used to investigate the association between the DII and incident hypertension. The analyses were adjusted for demographic and hypertension risk factors. During 12-years follow-up we identified 1680 incident cases of hypertension. A more pro-inflammatory diet was associated with higher risk of hypertension in dichotomised analyses with an ORfully adjusted of 1.24, 95% CI: 1.06-1.45.

CONCLUSION: A pro-inflammatory diet might lead to a higher risk of developing hypertension. These results need to be replicated in other studies.

Age Factors, Australia/epidemiology, Biomarkers/blood, Blood Pressure, Dairy Products/adverse effects, Diet/adverse effects, Diet Surveys, Dietary Fats/adverse effects, Feeding Behavior, Female, Humans, Hypertension/diagnosis, Incidence, Inflammation/blood, Inflammation Mediators/blood, Longitudinal Studies, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Nonlinear Dynamics, Odds Ratio, Prospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Sex Factors
0939-4753
564-570
Vissers, L.E.T.
09877e30-4e8d-4e19-8337-f1aa69d97b55
Waller, M.
2f0779c2-2332-4635-89e3-a97000f30718
van der Schouw, Y.T.
13899835-7fbb-48ea-aea3-626c6b74e02d
Hébert, J.R.
3b57991f-f8d2-4322-bbce-ee49e7b43430
Shivappa, N.
ab7ce1dc-e4c3-4adc-9a45-cdd62acdfca0
Schoenaker, D.A.J.M.
84b96b87-4070-45a5-9777-5a1e4e45e818
Mishra, G.D.
02143b82-e536-4915-9b30-3c86cbe1a1fe
Vissers, L.E.T.
09877e30-4e8d-4e19-8337-f1aa69d97b55
Waller, M.
2f0779c2-2332-4635-89e3-a97000f30718
van der Schouw, Y.T.
13899835-7fbb-48ea-aea3-626c6b74e02d
Hébert, J.R.
3b57991f-f8d2-4322-bbce-ee49e7b43430
Shivappa, N.
ab7ce1dc-e4c3-4adc-9a45-cdd62acdfca0
Schoenaker, D.A.J.M.
84b96b87-4070-45a5-9777-5a1e4e45e818
Mishra, G.D.
02143b82-e536-4915-9b30-3c86cbe1a1fe

Vissers, L.E.T., Waller, M., van der Schouw, Y.T., Hébert, J.R., Shivappa, N., Schoenaker, D.A.J.M. and Mishra, G.D. (2017) A pro-inflammatory diet is associated with increased risk of developing hypertension among middle-aged women. Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases, 27 (6), 564-570. (doi:10.1016/j.numecd.2017.03.005).

Record type: Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: A pro-inflammatory diet is thought to lead to hypertension through oxidative stress and vessel wall inflammation. We therefore investigated the association between the dietary inflammatory index (DII) and developing hypertension in a population-based cohort of middle-aged women.

METHODS AND RESULTS: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health included 7169 Australian women, aged 52 years (SD 1 year) at baseline in 2001, who were followed up through 4 surveys until 2013. The DII, a literature-derived dietary index that has been validated against several inflammatory markers, was calculated based on data collected via a validated food-frequency questionnaire administered at baseline. Hypertension was defined as new onset of doctor-diagnosed hypertension, ascertained through self-report between 2001 and 2013. Generalised Estimating Equation analyses were used to investigate the association between the DII and incident hypertension. The analyses were adjusted for demographic and hypertension risk factors. During 12-years follow-up we identified 1680 incident cases of hypertension. A more pro-inflammatory diet was associated with higher risk of hypertension in dichotomised analyses with an ORfully adjusted of 1.24, 95% CI: 1.06-1.45.

CONCLUSION: A pro-inflammatory diet might lead to a higher risk of developing hypertension. These results need to be replicated in other studies.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 16 March 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 29 March 2017
Published date: June 2017
Keywords: Age Factors, Australia/epidemiology, Biomarkers/blood, Blood Pressure, Dairy Products/adverse effects, Diet/adverse effects, Diet Surveys, Dietary Fats/adverse effects, Feeding Behavior, Female, Humans, Hypertension/diagnosis, Incidence, Inflammation/blood, Inflammation Mediators/blood, Longitudinal Studies, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Nonlinear Dynamics, Odds Ratio, Prospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Sex Factors

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 441220
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/441220
ISSN: 0939-4753
PURE UUID: e5747745-d503-4eac-921d-b1cd6b9088ca
ORCID for D.A.J.M. Schoenaker: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7652-990X

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Date deposited: 05 Jun 2020 16:31
Last modified: 10 Jan 2022 03:21

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Contributors

Author: L.E.T. Vissers
Author: M. Waller
Author: Y.T. van der Schouw
Author: J.R. Hébert
Author: N. Shivappa
Author: G.D. Mishra

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