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A review of gas evolution in lithium ion batteries

A review of gas evolution in lithium ion batteries
A review of gas evolution in lithium ion batteries
This is a review on recent studies into the gas evolution occurring within lithium ion batteries and the mechanisms through which the processes proceed. New cathode materials such as lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxides are being heavily researched for the development of higher specific capacity electrodes. These materials often suffer from rapid degradation which coincides with gas evolution. Further sources of gas evolution include electrolyte reduction at the anode during the initial cycles culminating in formation of a solid electrolyte interphase and surface layer compounds formed on the cathode during production and storage. There have been several techniques established for detection and quantification of gas evolution in ex situ and in situ studies, primarily gas chromatography mass spectrometry and differential/on-line electrochemical mass spectrometry.
Batteries, DEMS, Gas evolution, Lithium-ion, NMC
2352-4847
10-18
Rowden, Ben
6d8fa028-8ef6-4589-bf1b-dde4d4fb18f2
Garcia-Araez, Nuria
9358a0f9-309c-495e-b6bf-da985ad81c37
Rowden, Ben
6d8fa028-8ef6-4589-bf1b-dde4d4fb18f2
Garcia-Araez, Nuria
9358a0f9-309c-495e-b6bf-da985ad81c37

Rowden, Ben and Garcia-Araez, Nuria (2020) A review of gas evolution in lithium ion batteries. Energy Reports, 6, Suppl. 5, 10-18. (doi:10.1016/j.egyr.2020.02.022).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This is a review on recent studies into the gas evolution occurring within lithium ion batteries and the mechanisms through which the processes proceed. New cathode materials such as lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxides are being heavily researched for the development of higher specific capacity electrodes. These materials often suffer from rapid degradation which coincides with gas evolution. Further sources of gas evolution include electrolyte reduction at the anode during the initial cycles culminating in formation of a solid electrolyte interphase and surface layer compounds formed on the cathode during production and storage. There have been several techniques established for detection and quantification of gas evolution in ex situ and in situ studies, primarily gas chromatography mass spectrometry and differential/on-line electrochemical mass spectrometry.

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Accepted/In Press date: 25 February 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 21 May 2020
Keywords: Batteries, DEMS, Gas evolution, Lithium-ion, NMC

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 441348
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/441348
ISSN: 2352-4847
PURE UUID: 4ff14d8d-d3d4-48ed-9f19-e15080e682b3
ORCID for Nuria Garcia-Araez: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9095-2379

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Date deposited: 10 Jun 2020 16:31
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 03:00

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Author: Ben Rowden

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