The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Peer-education as a tool to educate on antibiotics, resistance and use in 16-18-year-olds: a feasibility study

Peer-education as a tool to educate on antibiotics, resistance and use in 16-18-year-olds: a feasibility study
Peer-education as a tool to educate on antibiotics, resistance and use in 16-18-year-olds: a feasibility study

Peer education (PE) interventions may help improve knowledge and appropriate use of antibiotics in young adults. In this feasibility study, health-care students were trained to educate 16-18 years old biology students, who then educated their non-biology peers, using e-Bug antibiotic lessons. Knowledge was assessed by questionnaires, and antibiotic use by questionnaire, SMS messaging and GP record searches. Five of 17 schools approached participated (3 PE and 2 control (usual lessons)). 59% (10/17) of university students and 28% (15/54) of biology students volunteered as peer-educators. PE was well-received; 30% (38/127) intervention students and 55% (66/120) control students completed all questionnaires. Antibiotic use from GP medical records (54/136, 40% of students' data available), student SMS (69/136, 51% replied) and questionnaire (109/136, 80% completed) data showed good agreement between GP and SMS (kappa = 0.72), but poor agreement between GP and questionnaires (kappa = 0.06). Median knowledge scores were higher post-intervention, with greater improvement for non-biology students. Delivering and evaluating e-Bug PE is feasible with supportive school staff. Single tiered PE by university students may be easier to regulate and manage due to time constraints on school students. SMS collection of antibiotic data is easier and has similar accuracy to GP data.

Antibiotic resistance, Antibiotics, Biology, Health education, Peer education, Students
2079-6382
McNulty, Cliodna A M
efcc95ca-272c-4e8f-aa2d-189d59acfc48
Syeda, Rowshonara B
cad72fbc-7174-42e6-8411-f662113b850f
Brown, Carla L
4817b709-0271-4277-8eba-da0a096558f9
Bennett, C Verity
520d3131-7339-47ef-b5d1-cd5007144661
Schofield, Behnaz
0a9a7bef-6f21-4045-b7cc-fc3104d7a843
Allison, David G
80933850-ed48-487c-9a7d-26101277948b
Verlander, Neville Q
c5095a36-2893-471a-92d9-68cc2ef26f80
Francis, Nick
9b610883-605c-4fee-871d-defaa86ccf8e
McNulty, Cliodna A M
efcc95ca-272c-4e8f-aa2d-189d59acfc48
Syeda, Rowshonara B
cad72fbc-7174-42e6-8411-f662113b850f
Brown, Carla L
4817b709-0271-4277-8eba-da0a096558f9
Bennett, C Verity
520d3131-7339-47ef-b5d1-cd5007144661
Schofield, Behnaz
0a9a7bef-6f21-4045-b7cc-fc3104d7a843
Allison, David G
80933850-ed48-487c-9a7d-26101277948b
Verlander, Neville Q
c5095a36-2893-471a-92d9-68cc2ef26f80
Francis, Nick
9b610883-605c-4fee-871d-defaa86ccf8e

McNulty, Cliodna A M, Syeda, Rowshonara B, Brown, Carla L, Bennett, C Verity, Schofield, Behnaz, Allison, David G, Verlander, Neville Q and Francis, Nick (2020) Peer-education as a tool to educate on antibiotics, resistance and use in 16-18-year-olds: a feasibility study. Antibiotics, 9 (4), [146]. (doi:10.3390/antibiotics9040146).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Peer education (PE) interventions may help improve knowledge and appropriate use of antibiotics in young adults. In this feasibility study, health-care students were trained to educate 16-18 years old biology students, who then educated their non-biology peers, using e-Bug antibiotic lessons. Knowledge was assessed by questionnaires, and antibiotic use by questionnaire, SMS messaging and GP record searches. Five of 17 schools approached participated (3 PE and 2 control (usual lessons)). 59% (10/17) of university students and 28% (15/54) of biology students volunteered as peer-educators. PE was well-received; 30% (38/127) intervention students and 55% (66/120) control students completed all questionnaires. Antibiotic use from GP medical records (54/136, 40% of students' data available), student SMS (69/136, 51% replied) and questionnaire (109/136, 80% completed) data showed good agreement between GP and SMS (kappa = 0.72), but poor agreement between GP and questionnaires (kappa = 0.06). Median knowledge scores were higher post-intervention, with greater improvement for non-biology students. Delivering and evaluating e-Bug PE is feasible with supportive school staff. Single tiered PE by university students may be easier to regulate and manage due to time constraints on school students. SMS collection of antibiotic data is easier and has similar accuracy to GP data.

Text
Peer-Education as a Tool to Educate on Antibiotics - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (1MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 23 March 2020
Published date: 30 March 2020
Keywords: Antibiotic resistance, Antibiotics, Biology, Health education, Peer education, Students

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 441354
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/441354
ISSN: 2079-6382
PURE UUID: c0139a3a-86a4-4989-b601-09bfae6cf39f
ORCID for Nick Francis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8939-7312

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Jun 2020 16:31
Last modified: 10 Jan 2022 03:19

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Cliodna A M McNulty
Author: Rowshonara B Syeda
Author: Carla L Brown
Author: C Verity Bennett
Author: Behnaz Schofield
Author: David G Allison
Author: Neville Q Verlander
Author: Nick Francis ORCID iD

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×