The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Predictors of children's health system use: cross-sectional study of linked data

Predictors of children's health system use: cross-sectional study of linked data
Predictors of children's health system use: cross-sectional study of linked data
Background
Use of health services is increasing in many countries. Most health service research exploring determinants of use has focused on adults and on secondary care. Less is known about factors associated with use of the emergency department and general practice among young children.

Objective
To explore factors associated with general practice(GP) consultations and emergency department (ED) attendances among children under five in a single UK city.

Methods
Cross-sectional exploratory study using anonymised individual-level health service use data for children aged 0-4 from 21 general practices in Southampton, UK, linked to emergency department data, over a one-year period. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression were used to explore the association of sociodemographic factors (using the 2015 Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) to define socioeconomic status) with high service use (defined as more than eight GP consultations and /or two ED attendances respectively).

Results
Among 11,062 children there were 76,092 GP consultations and 6107 ED attendances. 3233 (29%) children were high users of GP and 564 (5%) of ED services. Greater socioeconomic deprivation was
independently associated with high use of GP and ED services separately (odds ratios (OR) for most vs. least deprived IMD quintile 1.45 (95%CI 1.20 to 1.75) and 2.21(95%CI 1.41 to 3.46)respectively), and together (OR 2.62 (95%CI 1.48 to 4.65)).

Conclusion
Young children are frequent users of health services, particularly general practice. Socioeconomic deprivation is an important factor. Parents, carers and health services may benefit from interventions that support families in their management of children’s health.
Children, cross-sectional study, emergency department, general practice, health services, socio-economic factors
0263-2136
807-814
Perrin, Rebecca
0d7d9086-7d67-4038-8857-3ed3dc60cee4
Patel, Sanjay
bc976df6-0414-459f-8390-3eca85e07d97
Lees, Amanda
882f4aea-28ee-458c-b164-6109732b8714
Smith, Dianna
e859097c-f9f5-4fd0-8b07-59218648e726
Woodcock, Tina
47fab05d-2843-4765-80b1-eb1d1b0d343d
Harris, Scott
19ea097b-df15-4f0f-be19-8ac42c190028
Fraser, Simon
135884b6-8737-4e8a-a98c-5d803ac7a2dc
Perrin, Rebecca
0d7d9086-7d67-4038-8857-3ed3dc60cee4
Patel, Sanjay
bc976df6-0414-459f-8390-3eca85e07d97
Lees, Amanda
882f4aea-28ee-458c-b164-6109732b8714
Smith, Dianna
e859097c-f9f5-4fd0-8b07-59218648e726
Woodcock, Tina
47fab05d-2843-4765-80b1-eb1d1b0d343d
Harris, Scott
19ea097b-df15-4f0f-be19-8ac42c190028
Fraser, Simon
135884b6-8737-4e8a-a98c-5d803ac7a2dc

Perrin, Rebecca, Patel, Sanjay, Lees, Amanda, Smith, Dianna, Woodcock, Tina, Harris, Scott and Fraser, Simon (2020) Predictors of children's health system use: cross-sectional study of linked data. Family Practice, 37 (6), 807-814, [cmaa061]. (doi:10.1093/fampra/cmaa061).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background
Use of health services is increasing in many countries. Most health service research exploring determinants of use has focused on adults and on secondary care. Less is known about factors associated with use of the emergency department and general practice among young children.

Objective
To explore factors associated with general practice(GP) consultations and emergency department (ED) attendances among children under five in a single UK city.

Methods
Cross-sectional exploratory study using anonymised individual-level health service use data for children aged 0-4 from 21 general practices in Southampton, UK, linked to emergency department data, over a one-year period. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression were used to explore the association of sociodemographic factors (using the 2015 Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) to define socioeconomic status) with high service use (defined as more than eight GP consultations and /or two ED attendances respectively).

Results
Among 11,062 children there were 76,092 GP consultations and 6107 ED attendances. 3233 (29%) children were high users of GP and 564 (5%) of ED services. Greater socioeconomic deprivation was
independently associated with high use of GP and ED services separately (odds ratios (OR) for most vs. least deprived IMD quintile 1.45 (95%CI 1.20 to 1.75) and 2.21(95%CI 1.41 to 3.46)respectively), and together (OR 2.62 (95%CI 1.48 to 4.65)).

Conclusion
Young children are frequent users of health services, particularly general practice. Socioeconomic deprivation is an important factor. Parents, carers and health services may benefit from interventions that support families in their management of children’s health.

Text
Paeds Data Paper May2 0v0.19 for 2nd submission - Accepted Manuscript
Download (354kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 8 June 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 7 July 2020
Keywords: Children, cross-sectional study, emergency department, general practice, health services, socio-economic factors

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 441507
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/441507
ISSN: 0263-2136
PURE UUID: d75bb437-0a79-4055-8054-17a584ec70e0
ORCID for Dianna Smith: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0650-6606
ORCID for Simon Fraser: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4172-4406

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Jun 2020 16:31
Last modified: 10 Jan 2022 03:04

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Rebecca Perrin
Author: Sanjay Patel
Author: Amanda Lees
Author: Dianna Smith ORCID iD
Author: Tina Woodcock
Author: Scott Harris
Author: Simon Fraser ORCID iD

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×