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Progress in ferroelectric domain engineering at the micro/nanoscale

Progress in ferroelectric domain engineering at the micro/nanoscale
Progress in ferroelectric domain engineering at the micro/nanoscale
Ferroelectric materials such as lithium niobate (LN) or lithium tantalate (LT) are examples of an extremely versatile class of optical crystals. In bulk single crystal, single domain format, these crystalline hosts find numerous applications in nonlinear optics, optical storage, photorefraction, surface acoustic wave devices, optical waveguides, piezoelectric and pyroelectric devices and electro-optic modulation. Single domain crystals can be subsequently engineered via spatially selective poling to yield domain structures whose size can lie in the region of a few tens of µm to sub-µm, for applications and device fabrication that are impossible to implement in single domain geometry. This paper discusses our progress to date in micro- and nanostructuring of such materials, for applications in nonlinear optics, switching and deflection, and 3-dimensional sculpting for possible MEMS use. The techniques and benefits are discussed of using both light-assisted and direct optical poling for achieving controllable domains that can be irregular or periodic, bulk or surface, at sizes that approach the 100 nm scale. For surface inversion, domain features can be produced that lack the otherwise characteristic crystal symmetry imposed hexagonal shapes observed in conventional electric field poling.
Wiley
Eason, R.W.
e38684c3-d18c-41b9-a4aa-def67283b020
Mailis, S.
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Sones, C.L.
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Boyland, A.J.
e6e842e6-0fe6-4de2-a9b8-ca44f30ab4d5
Muir, A.C.
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Sono, T.J.
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Scott, J.G.
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Valdivia, C.E.
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Wellington, I.T.
cb4650a6-28af-4553-884d-b05fc4508969
Affatigato, Mario
Eason, R.W.
e38684c3-d18c-41b9-a4aa-def67283b020
Mailis, S.
233e0768-3f8d-430e-8fdf-92e6f4f6a0c4
Sones, C.L.
9de9d8ee-d394-46a5-80b7-e341c0eed0a8
Boyland, A.J.
e6e842e6-0fe6-4de2-a9b8-ca44f30ab4d5
Muir, A.C.
15a6eb94-0cc5-4cbd-a298-715ae981fe86
Sono, T.J.
06258e0e-3de8-4480-a3ff-ca5cc218f0db
Scott, J.G.
0ca058e1-cd64-4e07-a209-80c9dc79d343
Valdivia, C.E.
60f58c07-eaca-45c7-bb65-60aecf1835c4
Wellington, I.T.
cb4650a6-28af-4553-884d-b05fc4508969
Affatigato, Mario

Eason, R.W., Mailis, S., Sones, C.L., Boyland, A.J., Muir, A.C., Sono, T.J., Scott, J.G., Valdivia, C.E. and Wellington, I.T. (2006) Progress in ferroelectric domain engineering at the micro/nanoscale. In, Affatigato, Mario (ed.) Advances in Glass and Optical Materials II: Ceramic Transactions Series: Proceedings of the 6th Pacific Rim Conference on Ceramic and Glass Technology (PacRim6); September 11-16, 2005; Maul, Hawaii. (Ceramic Transactions Series, , (doi:10.1002/9781118144121.ch10), 196) Wiley. (doi:10.1002/9781118144121.ch10).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Ferroelectric materials such as lithium niobate (LN) or lithium tantalate (LT) are examples of an extremely versatile class of optical crystals. In bulk single crystal, single domain format, these crystalline hosts find numerous applications in nonlinear optics, optical storage, photorefraction, surface acoustic wave devices, optical waveguides, piezoelectric and pyroelectric devices and electro-optic modulation. Single domain crystals can be subsequently engineered via spatially selective poling to yield domain structures whose size can lie in the region of a few tens of µm to sub-µm, for applications and device fabrication that are impossible to implement in single domain geometry. This paper discusses our progress to date in micro- and nanostructuring of such materials, for applications in nonlinear optics, switching and deflection, and 3-dimensional sculpting for possible MEMS use. The techniques and benefits are discussed of using both light-assisted and direct optical poling for achieving controllable domains that can be irregular or periodic, bulk or surface, at sizes that approach the 100 nm scale. For surface inversion, domain features can be produced that lack the otherwise characteristic crystal symmetry imposed hexagonal shapes observed in conventional electric field poling.

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Published date: 1 June 2006

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 441527
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/441527
PURE UUID: 537652cd-f683-4a6d-aa5e-312c00d29178
ORCID for R.W. Eason: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9704-2204
ORCID for S. Mailis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8100-2670

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Date deposited: 17 Jun 2020 16:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:51

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