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The maturing relationship between Quaternary paleoecology and ancient sedimentary DNA

The maturing relationship between Quaternary paleoecology and ancient sedimentary DNA
The maturing relationship between Quaternary paleoecology and ancient sedimentary DNA
In the two decades or so since ancient sedimentary DNA (sedaDNA) took its place as a new Quaternary paleo-proxy, there have been large advances in the scope of its applications and its reliability. The two main approaches, metabarcoding and shotgun sequencing, have contributed exciting insights into areas such as floristic diversity change, plant-herbivore interactions, extinction, conservation baselines and impacts of invasive species. Early doubts as to its potential to contribute novel information have been dispelled; more is now understood about the passage of sedaDNA from the original organism to a component of soil or sediment and about the range of uncertainties that must be addressed in the interpretation of data. With its move into the mainstream, it is now time to develop effective data archives for sedaDNA, refine our understanding of central issues such as taphonomy, and further expand the potential for describing, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the history of past ecosystems.
ancient sedimentary DNA;, metabarcoding, paleoecology;, proxy
0033-5894
39–47
Edwards, Mary
4b6a3389-f3a4-4933-b8fd-acdfef72200e
Edwards, Mary
4b6a3389-f3a4-4933-b8fd-acdfef72200e

Edwards, Mary (2020) The maturing relationship between Quaternary paleoecology and ancient sedimentary DNA. Quaternary Research, 96, 39–47. (doi:10.1017/qua.2020.52).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In the two decades or so since ancient sedimentary DNA (sedaDNA) took its place as a new Quaternary paleo-proxy, there have been large advances in the scope of its applications and its reliability. The two main approaches, metabarcoding and shotgun sequencing, have contributed exciting insights into areas such as floristic diversity change, plant-herbivore interactions, extinction, conservation baselines and impacts of invasive species. Early doubts as to its potential to contribute novel information have been dispelled; more is now understood about the passage of sedaDNA from the original organism to a component of soil or sediment and about the range of uncertainties that must be addressed in the interpretation of data. With its move into the mainstream, it is now time to develop effective data archives for sedaDNA, refine our understanding of central issues such as taphonomy, and further expand the potential for describing, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the history of past ecosystems.

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Edwards forum revision 1_v2.1 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 11 May 2020
Published date: 15 June 2020
Keywords: ancient sedimentary DNA;, metabarcoding, paleoecology;, proxy

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 441821
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/441821
ISSN: 0033-5894
PURE UUID: c629280c-5d53-4cc4-a60d-19a5469360d8
ORCID for Mary Edwards: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3490-6682

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Jun 2020 16:32
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 06:57

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