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Carbonate sedimentation around Jebel Dhanna: models for parts of the buried Holocene sabkha sequences elsewhere along the Abu Dhabi coastline

Carbonate sedimentation around Jebel Dhanna: models for parts of the buried Holocene sabkha sequences elsewhere along the Abu Dhabi coastline
Carbonate sedimentation around Jebel Dhanna: models for parts of the buried Holocene sabkha sequences elsewhere along the Abu Dhabi coastline

The early Holocene mainland coast of Abu Dhabi Emirate consisted of a series of embayments between headlands of Miocene inliers and Pleistocene carbonate seif dunes. Subsequently, most of those embayments were back-filled to form coastal sabkhas. The facies and gross depositional characteristics of modern embayments adjacent to Jebel Dhanna are described and used as analogues for former embayments such as those landward of Abu Dhabi Island. Unfortunately, the sedimentology of both modern and earlier embayments have been severely or completely destroyed by industrial and urban developments but vintage aerial photography and satellite imagery have revealed the former topography.

Abu Dhabi, Embayments, Holocene, Jebel Dhanna, Mussafah Channel, Spits
0891-2556
Kirkham, Anthony
eaf838ea-6d22-4414-bae4-6ccaf49eeb7e
Evans, Graham
91b97921-cf93-44fc-9f0d-d70b31a9d20d
Kirkham, Anthony
eaf838ea-6d22-4414-bae4-6ccaf49eeb7e
Evans, Graham
91b97921-cf93-44fc-9f0d-d70b31a9d20d

Kirkham, Anthony and Evans, Graham (2020) Carbonate sedimentation around Jebel Dhanna: models for parts of the buried Holocene sabkha sequences elsewhere along the Abu Dhabi coastline. Carbonates and Evaporites, 35 (1), [24]. (doi:10.1007/s13146-020-00561-0).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The early Holocene mainland coast of Abu Dhabi Emirate consisted of a series of embayments between headlands of Miocene inliers and Pleistocene carbonate seif dunes. Subsequently, most of those embayments were back-filled to form coastal sabkhas. The facies and gross depositional characteristics of modern embayments adjacent to Jebel Dhanna are described and used as analogues for former embayments such as those landward of Abu Dhabi Island. Unfortunately, the sedimentology of both modern and earlier embayments have been severely or completely destroyed by industrial and urban developments but vintage aerial photography and satellite imagery have revealed the former topography.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 11 February 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 23 February 2020
Published date: 23 February 2020
Additional Information: Funding Information: The authors wish to thank the following individuals for their support in the field at various times in recent years: Bryan Twombley, Philippe Lapointe, Hugh Nicholson and Peter Hellyer. Kate Davis kindly assisted with the drafting of figures. Publisher Copyright: © 2020, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature.
Keywords: Abu Dhabi, Embayments, Holocene, Jebel Dhanna, Mussafah Channel, Spits

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 442040
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/442040
ISSN: 0891-2556
PURE UUID: c458e035-66f5-499f-8498-c9712840f5e7

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Date deposited: 06 Jul 2020 16:30
Last modified: 20 Sep 2022 17:07

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Author: Anthony Kirkham
Author: Graham Evans

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