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Four modes of neighborhood governance: the view from Nanjing, China

Four modes of neighborhood governance: the view from Nanjing, China
Four modes of neighborhood governance: the view from Nanjing, China
In a context of global moves towards decentralization and neighborhood governance, this paper focuses on neighborhood governance in Nanjing, China. Drawing on interviews and observations in 32 neighborhoods, the paper asks how neighborhood governance is working out in different neighborhoods. Four modes of neighborhood governance are identified and described: collective consumption, service privatization, civic provision, and state-sponsored governance. The paper argues that neighborhood governance works out on the ground in diverse and complex ways, such that scholars need to be cautious when seeking to generalize about neighborhood governance (at the scale of the city, let alone the nation-state or the globe). With appropriate caution, the paper also argues that: relationships between actors are important units of analysis when considering how effective governance is achieved in different neighborhoods; diversity and complexity in neighborhood governance partly reflect the role of the state in these relationships; and the role of the state partly reflects, in turn, processes of policy evolution in particular neighborhoods.
China, decentralization, neighbourhood governance, the state
0319-1317
535-554
Wang, Ying
9f99be6c-c16d-4204-9ae8-36343e2349dc
Clarke, Nicholas
4ed65752-5210-4f9e-aeff-9188520510e8
Wang, Ying
9f99be6c-c16d-4204-9ae8-36343e2349dc
Clarke, Nicholas
4ed65752-5210-4f9e-aeff-9188520510e8

Wang, Ying and Clarke, Nicholas (2021) Four modes of neighborhood governance: the view from Nanjing, China. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 45 (3), 535-554. (doi:10.1111/1468-2427.12983).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In a context of global moves towards decentralization and neighborhood governance, this paper focuses on neighborhood governance in Nanjing, China. Drawing on interviews and observations in 32 neighborhoods, the paper asks how neighborhood governance is working out in different neighborhoods. Four modes of neighborhood governance are identified and described: collective consumption, service privatization, civic provision, and state-sponsored governance. The paper argues that neighborhood governance works out on the ground in diverse and complex ways, such that scholars need to be cautious when seeking to generalize about neighborhood governance (at the scale of the city, let alone the nation-state or the globe). With appropriate caution, the paper also argues that: relationships between actors are important units of analysis when considering how effective governance is achieved in different neighborhoods; diversity and complexity in neighborhood governance partly reflect the role of the state in these relationships; and the role of the state partly reflects, in turn, processes of policy evolution in particular neighborhoods.

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Four modes of neighborhood governance FAVPPR - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 21 January 2022.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 22 June 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 21 January 2021
Published date: 21 January 2021
Keywords: China, decentralization, neighbourhood governance, the state

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 442222
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/442222
ISSN: 0319-1317
PURE UUID: 59849fc2-a75a-4462-a8a1-bf87aa245ba0
ORCID for Ying Wang: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8664-6894
ORCID for Nicholas Clarke: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9148-9849

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Jul 2020 16:31
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:49

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Contributors

Author: Ying Wang ORCID iD
Author: Nicholas Clarke ORCID iD

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