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Experiences, causes, and measures to tackle institutional incongruence and informal economic activity in South-East Europe

Experiences, causes, and measures to tackle institutional incongruence and informal economic activity in South-East Europe
Experiences, causes, and measures to tackle institutional incongruence and informal economic activity in South-East Europe
To explain the prevalence and persistence of informal economic activity globally, scholars have recently advanced an institutional incongruence perspective. Institutional incongruence exists where there is a misalignment between what is considered legitimate by a society’s formal institutions (e.g. its laws and regulations) and its informal institutions (e.g. norms, values and beliefs). Reporting findings from a series of qualitative focus groups in Bulgaria, Croatia and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, this article explores relationships between such institutional incongruence and informal economic activity. In particular, it sheds light on how informality and institutional incongruence are experienced by individuals in South-East Europe. It furthermore provides insights on the causes of such incongruence, and how it can lead to informal economic activity. Finally, it reports on individuals’ perceptions towards different measures to tackle institutional incongruence and informal economic activity, with implications for policymakers in South-East Europe and more widely.
0011-3921
Littlewood, David
0ba274ff-dae9-4bfe-b4c0-f5318e024f5e
Rodgers, Peter
78e39552-3d65-4b44-b0e1-10043ba3ff5d
Williams, Colin
6e730cf9-1ec1-47a9-9e60-64b5c8ca2cbd
Littlewood, David
0ba274ff-dae9-4bfe-b4c0-f5318e024f5e
Rodgers, Peter
78e39552-3d65-4b44-b0e1-10043ba3ff5d
Williams, Colin
6e730cf9-1ec1-47a9-9e60-64b5c8ca2cbd

Littlewood, David, Rodgers, Peter and Williams, Colin (2018) Experiences, causes, and measures to tackle institutional incongruence and informal economic activity in South-East Europe. Current Sociology. (doi:10.1177/0011392118788911).

Record type: Article

Abstract

To explain the prevalence and persistence of informal economic activity globally, scholars have recently advanced an institutional incongruence perspective. Institutional incongruence exists where there is a misalignment between what is considered legitimate by a society’s formal institutions (e.g. its laws and regulations) and its informal institutions (e.g. norms, values and beliefs). Reporting findings from a series of qualitative focus groups in Bulgaria, Croatia and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, this article explores relationships between such institutional incongruence and informal economic activity. In particular, it sheds light on how informality and institutional incongruence are experienced by individuals in South-East Europe. It furthermore provides insights on the causes of such incongruence, and how it can lead to informal economic activity. Finally, it reports on individuals’ perceptions towards different measures to tackle institutional incongruence and informal economic activity, with implications for policymakers in South-East Europe and more widely.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 25 July 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 25 July 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 442300
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/442300
ISSN: 0011-3921
PURE UUID: bb861d77-4cff-45a4-9e25-d383612e3b33

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Date deposited: 13 Jul 2020 16:30
Last modified: 06 Oct 2020 21:11

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Contributors

Author: David Littlewood
Author: Peter Rodgers
Author: Colin Williams

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