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Landfill as a resource: Issues in environmental science & technology: waste as a resource

Landfill as a resource: Issues in environmental science & technology: waste as a resource
Landfill as a resource: Issues in environmental science & technology: waste as a resource
Over the past decade or so, the emphasis in Europe and other developed countries has moved from waste to resource management. Re‐usable or recyclable materials are increasingly recovered from the waste stream and organic materials treated prior to landfill; this has resulted in a fundamental change in the nature of the material going to a modern landfill. However, historic landfills remain a potential resource in terms of both materials recovery and the generation of biogas. This chapter assesses the potential benefits of this resource and how it might be exploited, in addition to discussing the engineered controls likely to be needed to prevent pollution of the environment through leakage of leachate into groundwater or the escape of residual biogas from a new landfill containing a more highly processed residual waste.
205-226
Royal Society of Chemistry
Watson, Geoff
a7b86a0a-9a2c-44d2-99ed-a6c02b2a356d
Powrie, William
600c3f02-00f8-4486-ae4b-b4fc8ec77c3c
Hester, R.E.
Harrison, R.M.
Watson, Geoff
a7b86a0a-9a2c-44d2-99ed-a6c02b2a356d
Powrie, William
600c3f02-00f8-4486-ae4b-b4fc8ec77c3c
Hester, R.E.
Harrison, R.M.

Watson, Geoff and Powrie, William (2013) Landfill as a resource: Issues in environmental science & technology: waste as a resource. In, Hester, R.E. and Harrison, R.M. (eds.) Waste as a Resource. Royal Society of Chemistry, pp. 205-226. (In Press) (doi:10.1039/9781849737883-00205).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Over the past decade or so, the emphasis in Europe and other developed countries has moved from waste to resource management. Re‐usable or recyclable materials are increasingly recovered from the waste stream and organic materials treated prior to landfill; this has resulted in a fundamental change in the nature of the material going to a modern landfill. However, historic landfills remain a potential resource in terms of both materials recovery and the generation of biogas. This chapter assesses the potential benefits of this resource and how it might be exploited, in addition to discussing the engineered controls likely to be needed to prevent pollution of the environment through leakage of leachate into groundwater or the escape of residual biogas from a new landfill containing a more highly processed residual waste.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 11 July 2013

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 442379
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/442379
PURE UUID: b787adb2-bfee-4701-bec5-a37b2e7b1c60
ORCID for Geoff Watson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3074-5196
ORCID for William Powrie: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2271-0826

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Jul 2020 16:31
Last modified: 05 Sep 2020 01:35

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