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Increased statin prescribing in patients with diabetes after the introduction of the NSF for Coronary Heart Disease

Increased statin prescribing in patients with diabetes after the introduction of the NSF for Coronary Heart Disease
Increased statin prescribing in patients with diabetes after the introduction of the NSF for Coronary Heart Disease
Cardiovascular disease accounts for 70% of deaths in people with diabetes. This is partly due to their abnormal lipoprotein profiles. Several studies have shown that the prescription of statins to this group of people can greatly reduce the risk of death. The National Service Framework for Coronary Heart Disease (NSF for CHD), introduced in March 2000, set targets for treating people at high risk of death from CHD. Our study looked at 14 practices in Surrey to see whether the NSF has had an impact on statin prescribing in people with diabetes over the age of 40. There has been a 21% increase in the prevalence of diabetes between 1999 and 2002. We have also shown a 74% increase in the prescribing of statins to people with diabetes following the introduction of the NSF for CHD. The increase in the number of people receiving statins has cost implications for primary care trusts.
diabetes mellitus, ischaemic heart disease, statins, national service framework for coronary heart disease
313-317
Bull, N.
80c5e2ec-5cdb-49a8-b685-2282db31506e
Williams, J.
2ab33bc3-4988-493b-9cd5-ac68d28385cb
Nicholls, P.
b806adfb-76d9-4b75-83b1-a1d63e779009
Lawrenson, R.A.
06832636-2d0e-44e9-98b5-b27c63b721f1
Bull, N.
80c5e2ec-5cdb-49a8-b685-2282db31506e
Williams, J.
2ab33bc3-4988-493b-9cd5-ac68d28385cb
Nicholls, P.
b806adfb-76d9-4b75-83b1-a1d63e779009
Lawrenson, R.A.
06832636-2d0e-44e9-98b5-b27c63b721f1

Bull, N., Williams, J., Nicholls, P. and Lawrenson, R.A. (2003) Increased statin prescribing in patients with diabetes after the introduction of the NSF for Coronary Heart Disease. Practical Diabetes International, 20 (9), 313-317. (doi:10.1002/pdi.548).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease accounts for 70% of deaths in people with diabetes. This is partly due to their abnormal lipoprotein profiles. Several studies have shown that the prescription of statins to this group of people can greatly reduce the risk of death. The National Service Framework for Coronary Heart Disease (NSF for CHD), introduced in March 2000, set targets for treating people at high risk of death from CHD. Our study looked at 14 practices in Surrey to see whether the NSF has had an impact on statin prescribing in people with diabetes over the age of 40. There has been a 21% increase in the prevalence of diabetes between 1999 and 2002. We have also shown a 74% increase in the prescribing of statins to people with diabetes following the introduction of the NSF for CHD. The increase in the number of people receiving statins has cost implications for primary care trusts.

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More information

Published date: October 2003
Keywords: diabetes mellitus, ischaemic heart disease, statins, national service framework for coronary heart disease

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 44241
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/44241
PURE UUID: f7aa67a4-c9cd-424b-9503-4099db3bd40e

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Date deposited: 20 Feb 2007
Last modified: 22 Jul 2022 20:52

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Contributors

Author: N. Bull
Author: J. Williams
Author: P. Nicholls
Author: R.A. Lawrenson

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