The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Fast and chaotic WDM all-optical polarization scrambler

Fast and chaotic WDM all-optical polarization scrambler
Fast and chaotic WDM all-optical polarization scrambler
The ability to randomly scramble the state-of-polarization (SOP) of a light beam is an important issue that encounters numerous applications in photonics. Polarization scrambling (PS) is indeed mainly implemented to ensure polarization diversity in optical telecommunication systems so as to combat deleterious polarization effects and provide mitigation of polarization mode dispersion (PMD) and polarization dependent loss or gain [1]. Here, we report a simple and efficient all-optical polarization scrambler based on the nonlinear interaction in a 5.3 km-long optical telecommunication fiber between a signal beam and its backward replica which is generated and amplified by a reflective loop (Fig. la). The basic principle of this device was first established in [2] in order to demonstrate a transparent method of temporal spying and concealing process for optical communications. Indeed, it consists in an additional operating mode, namely the chaotic mode, of the device called Omnipolarizer [3], originally conceived to operate as an all-optical polarization attractor and beam splitter [4].
Guasoni, M.
5aa684b2-643e-4598-93d6-bc633870c99a
Bony, P.-Y.
85325f82-aa34-42e3-a2e9-a26f4df59d18
Gilles, M.
9fbd0f77-5afb-41f7-8a3e-7afbbede61aa
Picozzi, A.
450f9a66-d279-4e86-8833-28b141264e38
Fatome, Julien
1547ee65-fff2-48a3-a9bd-73a89421a370
Guasoni, M.
5aa684b2-643e-4598-93d6-bc633870c99a
Bony, P.-Y.
85325f82-aa34-42e3-a2e9-a26f4df59d18
Gilles, M.
9fbd0f77-5afb-41f7-8a3e-7afbbede61aa
Picozzi, A.
450f9a66-d279-4e86-8833-28b141264e38
Fatome, Julien
1547ee65-fff2-48a3-a9bd-73a89421a370

Guasoni, M., Bony, P.-Y., Gilles, M., Picozzi, A. and Fatome, Julien (2015) Fast and chaotic WDM all-optical polarization scrambler. CLEO/Europe-EQEC 2015, , Munich, Germany. 21 - 25 Jun 2015.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The ability to randomly scramble the state-of-polarization (SOP) of a light beam is an important issue that encounters numerous applications in photonics. Polarization scrambling (PS) is indeed mainly implemented to ensure polarization diversity in optical telecommunication systems so as to combat deleterious polarization effects and provide mitigation of polarization mode dispersion (PMD) and polarization dependent loss or gain [1]. Here, we report a simple and efficient all-optical polarization scrambler based on the nonlinear interaction in a 5.3 km-long optical telecommunication fiber between a signal beam and its backward replica which is generated and amplified by a reflective loop (Fig. la). The basic principle of this device was first established in [2] in order to demonstrate a transparent method of temporal spying and concealing process for optical communications. Indeed, it consists in an additional operating mode, namely the chaotic mode, of the device called Omnipolarizer [3], originally conceived to operate as an all-optical polarization attractor and beam splitter [4].

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Published date: 21 June 2015
Venue - Dates: CLEO/Europe-EQEC 2015, , Munich, Germany, 2015-06-21 - 2015-06-25

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 442434
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/442434
PURE UUID: dbd0b39c-d3f5-490f-99ad-1c86672bed5c

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Jul 2020 16:31
Last modified: 08 Jan 2022 10:49

Export record

Contributors

Author: M. Guasoni
Author: P.-Y. Bony
Author: M. Gilles
Author: A. Picozzi
Author: Julien Fatome

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×