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Pregnancy, procreation, and moral parenthood

Pregnancy, procreation, and moral parenthood
Pregnancy, procreation, and moral parenthood
This three-paper thesis critically assesses certain presuppositions about pregnancy, procreation, and moral parenthood. Novel reproductive practices and technologies have given rise to situations in which forms of parenthood that have historically been coextensional come apart. The papers in this body of work demonstrate that our views of biological parenthood and moral parenthood as individual concepts are influenced by our understanding of the relationships between these forms of parenthood. However, that perceived relationship also shapes our understanding of those individual concepts of parenthood. The meanings we attribute to procreative roles – in particular, the significance we ascribe to pregnancy and childbirth – are influenced not just by our individual experiences and priorities, but more widely shared views about parental rights and parental obligations. In this body of work, I interrogate predominant views of the maternal-foetal relationship in pregnancy, and common assumptions about the concomitance of parental rights and of parental obligations. I aim to show that there is not one straightforward sense in which one becomes a parent, and that parental rights and obligations do not come in neat packages.
University of Southampton
Baron, Teresa Rachel
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Baron, Teresa Rachel
6cb59f4e-779b-43c2-b260-f6142b965984
Woollard, Fiona
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Mcelwee, Brian
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Baron, Teresa Rachel (2020) Pregnancy, procreation, and moral parenthood. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 110pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

This three-paper thesis critically assesses certain presuppositions about pregnancy, procreation, and moral parenthood. Novel reproductive practices and technologies have given rise to situations in which forms of parenthood that have historically been coextensional come apart. The papers in this body of work demonstrate that our views of biological parenthood and moral parenthood as individual concepts are influenced by our understanding of the relationships between these forms of parenthood. However, that perceived relationship also shapes our understanding of those individual concepts of parenthood. The meanings we attribute to procreative roles – in particular, the significance we ascribe to pregnancy and childbirth – are influenced not just by our individual experiences and priorities, but more widely shared views about parental rights and parental obligations. In this body of work, I interrogate predominant views of the maternal-foetal relationship in pregnancy, and common assumptions about the concomitance of parental rights and of parental obligations. I aim to show that there is not one straightforward sense in which one becomes a parent, and that parental rights and obligations do not come in neat packages.

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PhD Thesis_Teresa Baron - Version of Record
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Published date: April 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 442628
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/442628
PURE UUID: e5d7cad6-b37e-464a-a728-3dadf9451b5d

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Jul 2020 16:34
Last modified: 13 Dec 2021 06:09

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Contributors

Author: Teresa Rachel Baron
Thesis advisor: Fiona Woollard
Thesis advisor: Brian Mcelwee

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