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Tissue ingrowth markedly reduces mechanical anisotropy and stiffness in fibre direction of highly aligned electrospun polyurethane scaffolds

Tissue ingrowth markedly reduces mechanical anisotropy and stiffness in fibre direction of highly aligned electrospun polyurethane scaffolds
Tissue ingrowth markedly reduces mechanical anisotropy and stiffness in fibre direction of highly aligned electrospun polyurethane scaffolds
Purpose: The lack of long-term patency of synthetic vascular grafts currently available on the market has directed research towards improving the performance of small diameter grafts. Improved radial compliance matching and tissue ingrowth into the graft scaffold are amongst the main goals for an ideal vascular graft.

Methods: Biostable polyurethane scaffolds were manufactured by electrospinning and implanted in subcutaneous and circulatory positions in the rat for 7, 14 and 28 days. Scaffold morphology, tissue ingrowth, and mechanical properties of the scaffolds were assessed before implantation and after retrieval.

Results: Tissue ingrowth after 24 days was 96.5 ± 2.3% in the subcutaneous implants and 77.8 ± 5.4% in the circulatory implants. Over the 24 days implantation, the elastic modulus at 12% strain decreased by 59% in direction of the fibre alignment whereas it increased by 1379% transverse to the fibre alignment of the highly aligned scaffold of the subcutaneous implants. The lesser aligned scaffold of the circulatory graft implants exhibited an increase of the elastic modulus at 12% strain by 77% in circumferential direction.

Conclusion: Based on the observations, it is proposed that the mechanism underlying the softening of the highly aligned scaffold in the predominant fibre direction is associated with scaffold compaction and local displacement of fibres by the newly formed tissue. The stiffening of the scaffold, observed transverse to highly aligned fibres and for more a random fibre distribution, represents the actual mechanical contribution of the tissue that developed in the scaffold.
Electrospinning, elastic modulus, in vivo, stiffness, subcutaneous, tissue engineering, vascular
1869-408X
456-468
Krynauw, Hugo
bca56033-a190-40cc-83a3-176eee16fc50
Buescher, Jannik
bc3693e8-b8eb-403b-9875-2f2eea886f7b
Koehne, Josepha
e676d9c3-49f9-4731-9845-750d69555055
Verrijt, Loes
142d2279-9528-491f-8c12-c69a458a456e
Limbert, Georges
a1b88cb4-c5d9-4c6e-b6c9-7f4c4aa1c2ec
Davies, Neil H.
e52928b5-b051-443d-87c5-6463fe942865
Bezuidenhout, Deon
9b2c8bc3-625e-4000-bc02-2be1bcf8710d
Franz, Thomas
fe0873a7-c37b-4db5-99c0-70b62615ba3b
Krynauw, Hugo
bca56033-a190-40cc-83a3-176eee16fc50
Buescher, Jannik
bc3693e8-b8eb-403b-9875-2f2eea886f7b
Koehne, Josepha
e676d9c3-49f9-4731-9845-750d69555055
Verrijt, Loes
142d2279-9528-491f-8c12-c69a458a456e
Limbert, Georges
a1b88cb4-c5d9-4c6e-b6c9-7f4c4aa1c2ec
Davies, Neil H.
e52928b5-b051-443d-87c5-6463fe942865
Bezuidenhout, Deon
9b2c8bc3-625e-4000-bc02-2be1bcf8710d
Franz, Thomas
fe0873a7-c37b-4db5-99c0-70b62615ba3b

Krynauw, Hugo, Buescher, Jannik, Koehne, Josepha, Verrijt, Loes, Limbert, Georges, Davies, Neil H., Bezuidenhout, Deon and Franz, Thomas (2020) Tissue ingrowth markedly reduces mechanical anisotropy and stiffness in fibre direction of highly aligned electrospun polyurethane scaffolds. Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology, 11 (4), 456-468. (doi:10.1007/s13239-020-00475-x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose: The lack of long-term patency of synthetic vascular grafts currently available on the market has directed research towards improving the performance of small diameter grafts. Improved radial compliance matching and tissue ingrowth into the graft scaffold are amongst the main goals for an ideal vascular graft.

Methods: Biostable polyurethane scaffolds were manufactured by electrospinning and implanted in subcutaneous and circulatory positions in the rat for 7, 14 and 28 days. Scaffold morphology, tissue ingrowth, and mechanical properties of the scaffolds were assessed before implantation and after retrieval.

Results: Tissue ingrowth after 24 days was 96.5 ± 2.3% in the subcutaneous implants and 77.8 ± 5.4% in the circulatory implants. Over the 24 days implantation, the elastic modulus at 12% strain decreased by 59% in direction of the fibre alignment whereas it increased by 1379% transverse to the fibre alignment of the highly aligned scaffold of the subcutaneous implants. The lesser aligned scaffold of the circulatory graft implants exhibited an increase of the elastic modulus at 12% strain by 77% in circumferential direction.

Conclusion: Based on the observations, it is proposed that the mechanism underlying the softening of the highly aligned scaffold in the predominant fibre direction is associated with scaffold compaction and local displacement of fibres by the newly formed tissue. The stiffening of the scaffold, observed transverse to highly aligned fibres and for more a random fibre distribution, represents the actual mechanical contribution of the tissue that developed in the scaffold.

Text
CVET-D-19-00150_R2 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 23 June 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 1 July 2020
Keywords: Electrospinning, elastic modulus, in vivo, stiffness, subcutaneous, tissue engineering, vascular

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 442661
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/442661
ISSN: 1869-408X
PURE UUID: e953b6e8-0804-4a21-8921-2140ac0ce2bc

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Date deposited: 22 Jul 2020 16:39
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 05:56

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Contributors

Author: Hugo Krynauw
Author: Jannik Buescher
Author: Josepha Koehne
Author: Loes Verrijt
Author: Georges Limbert
Author: Neil H. Davies
Author: Deon Bezuidenhout
Author: Thomas Franz

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