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Preliminary investigations into the effects of breathing retraining techniques on end-tidal carbon dioxide measures in patients with asthma and healthy volunteers during a single treatment session

Preliminary investigations into the effects of breathing retraining techniques on end-tidal carbon dioxide measures in patients with asthma and healthy volunteers during a single treatment session
Preliminary investigations into the effects of breathing retraining techniques on end-tidal carbon dioxide measures in patients with asthma and healthy volunteers during a single treatment session
Objectives: Preliminary investigations into the physiological effects of breathing retraining techniques in order to establish the feasibility of the proposed methodology, produce data for power calculations and determine the potential for future research in this area.
Design: Two preliminary, exploratory studies with an experimental design.
Setting: Research laboratories.
Participants: Study 1: 15 patients with mild to moderate asthma and nine healthy volunteers. Study 2: 15 healthy volunteers.
Interventions: Physiological data from asthma patients and healthy volunteers were recorded before, during and after a single session of slow breathing and breath holds. A separate group of healthy participants carried out the slow breathing technique with and without visual biofeedback.
Outcome measures: The primary outcome was end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2), and the secondary outcomes were respiratory rate, pulse rate, oxygen saturation and lung function.
Results: All groups showed an increase in ETCO2 from baseline during slow breathing. Study 1 found a mean rise in ETCO2 of 0.48 kPa [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.28–0.68] for healthy participants and 0.46 kPa (95% CI 0.29–0.63) for asthma patients. In healthy volunteers, ETCO2 stayed above baseline for 5 minutes after the intervention. ETCO2 rose minimally (mean 0.06 kPa) in both groups after breath holds. Study 2 found a mean rise in ETCO2 of 0.35 kPa (95% CI 0.09–0.60) during slow breathing with visual feedback, and 0.36 kPa (95% CI 0.13–0.60) during slow breathing without visual feedback.
Conclusions: The results of these preliminary studies provide data to power larger studies. They suggest that ETCO2 rises during slow breathing in both asthma patients and healthy volunteers, and that this effect may persist beyond the intervention itself in healthy volunteers. The use of visual biofeedback had no effect on ETCO2 in healthy volunteers.
carbon dioxide, asthma, breathing retraining, biofeedback
0031-9406
30-36
Bruton, Anne
9f8b6076-6558-4d99-b7c8-72b03796ed95
Armstrong, Mary
f63ebb48-b6ba-4a26-8391-984be8cd4dae
Chadwick, Claire
21743de9-fd43-4b08-8064-dcd6e379282d
Gibson, Denise
a777f689-579e-478e-a8cc-6b3b85451595
Gahr, Katie
92061c38-fb2a-4976-88e1-3e2bb0b20873
Bruton, Anne
9f8b6076-6558-4d99-b7c8-72b03796ed95
Armstrong, Mary
f63ebb48-b6ba-4a26-8391-984be8cd4dae
Chadwick, Claire
21743de9-fd43-4b08-8064-dcd6e379282d
Gibson, Denise
a777f689-579e-478e-a8cc-6b3b85451595
Gahr, Katie
92061c38-fb2a-4976-88e1-3e2bb0b20873

Bruton, Anne, Armstrong, Mary, Chadwick, Claire, Gibson, Denise and Gahr, Katie (2007) Preliminary investigations into the effects of breathing retraining techniques on end-tidal carbon dioxide measures in patients with asthma and healthy volunteers during a single treatment session. Physiotherapy, 93 (1), 30-36. (doi:10.1016/j.physio.2006.07.006).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives: Preliminary investigations into the physiological effects of breathing retraining techniques in order to establish the feasibility of the proposed methodology, produce data for power calculations and determine the potential for future research in this area.
Design: Two preliminary, exploratory studies with an experimental design.
Setting: Research laboratories.
Participants: Study 1: 15 patients with mild to moderate asthma and nine healthy volunteers. Study 2: 15 healthy volunteers.
Interventions: Physiological data from asthma patients and healthy volunteers were recorded before, during and after a single session of slow breathing and breath holds. A separate group of healthy participants carried out the slow breathing technique with and without visual biofeedback.
Outcome measures: The primary outcome was end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2), and the secondary outcomes were respiratory rate, pulse rate, oxygen saturation and lung function.
Results: All groups showed an increase in ETCO2 from baseline during slow breathing. Study 1 found a mean rise in ETCO2 of 0.48 kPa [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.28–0.68] for healthy participants and 0.46 kPa (95% CI 0.29–0.63) for asthma patients. In healthy volunteers, ETCO2 stayed above baseline for 5 minutes after the intervention. ETCO2 rose minimally (mean 0.06 kPa) in both groups after breath holds. Study 2 found a mean rise in ETCO2 of 0.35 kPa (95% CI 0.09–0.60) during slow breathing with visual feedback, and 0.36 kPa (95% CI 0.13–0.60) during slow breathing without visual feedback.
Conclusions: The results of these preliminary studies provide data to power larger studies. They suggest that ETCO2 rises during slow breathing in both asthma patients and healthy volunteers, and that this effect may persist beyond the intervention itself in healthy volunteers. The use of visual biofeedback had no effect on ETCO2 in healthy volunteers.

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More information

Published date: 2007
Keywords: carbon dioxide, asthma, breathing retraining, biofeedback

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 44274
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/44274
ISSN: 0031-9406
PURE UUID: 66248759-1630-4c8d-85ec-a0567be78fec
ORCID for Anne Bruton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4550-2536

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Date deposited: 21 Feb 2007
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:52

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Contributors

Author: Anne Bruton ORCID iD
Author: Mary Armstrong
Author: Claire Chadwick
Author: Denise Gibson
Author: Katie Gahr

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