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Capillary-driven flow microfluidics combined with smartphone detection: an emerging tool for point-of-care diagnostics

Capillary-driven flow microfluidics combined with smartphone detection: an emerging tool for point-of-care diagnostics
Capillary-driven flow microfluidics combined with smartphone detection: an emerging tool for point-of-care diagnostics
Point-of-care (POC) or near-patient testing allows clinicians to accurately achieve real-time diagnostic results performed at or near to the patient site. The outlook of POC devices is to provide quicker analyses that can lead to well-informed clinical decisions and hence improve the health of patients at the point-of-need. Microfluidics plays an important role in the development of POC devices. However, requirements of handling expertise, pumping systems and complex fluidic controls make the technology unaffordable to the current healthcare systems in the world. In recent years, capillary-driven flow microfluidics has emerged as an attractive microfluidic-based technology to overcome these limitations by offering robust, cost-effective and simple-to-operate devices. The internal wall of the microchannels can be pre-coated with reagents, and by merely dipping the device into the patient sample, the sample can be loaded into the microchannel driven by capillary forces and can be detected via handheld or smartphone-based detectors. The capabilities of capillary-driven flow devices have not been fully exploited in developing POC diagnostics, especially for antimicrobial resistance studies in clinical settings. The purpose of this review is to open up this field of microfluidics to the ever-expanding microfluidic-based scientific community.
Antimicrobial resistance, Capillary action, Capillary-driven flow, Detections, Lab-on-a-chip, Microfluidics, Point-of-care diagnostics, Smartphone imaging
2075-4418
Hassan, Sammer-Ul
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Tariq, Aamira
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Noreen, Zobia
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Donia, Ahmed
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Zaidi, Syed Z J
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Bokhari, habib
1c3a1e18-4570-4a10-9feb-cea4218a275f
Zhang, Xunli
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Hassan, Sammer-Ul
8a5ae3f1-3451-4093-879e-85f40953da8b
Tariq, Aamira
4f936c30-424c-4cf6-8f95-cb7e81866140
Noreen, Zobia
60abc4bc-f93a-42f7-9703-e75e90b9e953
Donia, Ahmed
06fe19f6-6d02-485d-ad53-6f9b006129e8
Zaidi, Syed Z J
c519c0e6-ca5e-40e2-b025-34dd23d9ca5e
Bokhari, habib
1c3a1e18-4570-4a10-9feb-cea4218a275f
Zhang, Xunli
d7cf1181-3276-4da1-9150-e212b333abb1

Hassan, Sammer-Ul, Tariq, Aamira, Noreen, Zobia, Donia, Ahmed, Zaidi, Syed Z J, Bokhari, habib and Zhang, Xunli (2020) Capillary-driven flow microfluidics combined with smartphone detection: an emerging tool for point-of-care diagnostics. Diagnostics, 10 (8), [509]. (doi:10.3390/diagnostics10080509).

Record type: Review

Abstract

Point-of-care (POC) or near-patient testing allows clinicians to accurately achieve real-time diagnostic results performed at or near to the patient site. The outlook of POC devices is to provide quicker analyses that can lead to well-informed clinical decisions and hence improve the health of patients at the point-of-need. Microfluidics plays an important role in the development of POC devices. However, requirements of handling expertise, pumping systems and complex fluidic controls make the technology unaffordable to the current healthcare systems in the world. In recent years, capillary-driven flow microfluidics has emerged as an attractive microfluidic-based technology to overcome these limitations by offering robust, cost-effective and simple-to-operate devices. The internal wall of the microchannels can be pre-coated with reagents, and by merely dipping the device into the patient sample, the sample can be loaded into the microchannel driven by capillary forces and can be detected via handheld or smartphone-based detectors. The capabilities of capillary-driven flow devices have not been fully exploited in developing POC diagnostics, especially for antimicrobial resistance studies in clinical settings. The purpose of this review is to open up this field of microfluidics to the ever-expanding microfluidic-based scientific community.

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diagnostics-10-00509-v2 - Version of Record
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 20 July 2020
Published date: 22 July 2020
Keywords: Antimicrobial resistance, Capillary action, Capillary-driven flow, Detections, Lab-on-a-chip, Microfluidics, Point-of-care diagnostics, Smartphone imaging

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 442826
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/442826
ISSN: 2075-4418
PURE UUID: 31e2c319-4fdf-429d-9d00-b9606b663444
ORCID for Sammer-Ul Hassan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0319-5814
ORCID for Xunli Zhang: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4375-1571

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Jul 2020 16:31
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:52

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Contributors

Author: Aamira Tariq
Author: Zobia Noreen
Author: Ahmed Donia
Author: Syed Z J Zaidi
Author: habib Bokhari
Author: Xunli Zhang ORCID iD

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