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Effect of IL-13 receptor ?2 levels on the biological activity of IL-13 variant R110Q

Effect of IL-13 receptor ?2 levels on the biological activity of IL-13 variant R110Q
Effect of IL-13 receptor ?2 levels on the biological activity of IL-13 variant R110Q
BACKGROUND: IL-13 is a key cytokine associated with the asthmatic phenotype. IL-13 signals via its cognate receptor, a complex of IL-13 receptor (IL-13R) alpha 1 chain with IL-4 receptor alpha; however, a second protein, IL-13Ralpha2, also binds IL-13. Recently a polymorphic variant of IL-13 (R110Q) has been shown to be associated with atopy. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the binding properties of this IL-13 variant to its cognate receptors. METHODS: We used surface plasmon resonance to measure the binding kinetics of R110Q to its receptors. Primary human fibroblasts were grown from endobronchial biopsies obtained from volunteers. Receptor levels were measured by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the binding of R110Q with soluble human IL-13Ralpha1 compared with IL-13 (32 +/- 5 nmol/L and 36 +/- 7 nmol/L, respectively; P = .625). However, a small but significant difference was observed in the binding of R110Q to soluble human IL-13Ralpha2 compared with IL-13 (840 +/- 87 pmol/L and 1.1 +/- .05 nmol/L, respectively; P = .04). We observed that primary human lung fibroblasts expressed different levels of IL-13Ralpha2. Eotaxin release from fibroblasts expressing low IL-13Ralpha2 levels was significantly higher in response to R110Q compared with IL-13. This was not evident in cells that had high baseline IL-13Ralpha2 levels. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that relatively small changes in functional properties of a ligand combined with variation in receptor levels in vivo can result in significant differences in responsiveness. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Expression of R110Q and low IL-13Ralpha2 levels can result in important biological differences that may have clinical relevance in an atopic environment.
asthma, IL-13Ra2, IL-13, polymorphisms
0091-6749
91-97
Andrews, Allison-Lynn
4ddaec43-0f43-40cd-a191-aa53b0b30f16
Bucchieri, Fabio
d5c6c38a-8b02-4a37-afb0-c272033cb0d2
Arima, Kazuhiko
5998f5fa-9aa8-493c-ac97-716e1ffcfb46
Izuhara, Kenji
78fca599-a635-4357-b0ca-7c03338f1ba5
Holgate, Stephen T.
2e7c17a9-6796-436e-8772-1fe6d2ac5edc
Davies, Donna E.
7de8fdc7-3640-4e3a-aa91-d0e03f990c38
Holloway, John W.
4bbd77e6-c095-445d-a36b-a50a72f6fe1a
Andrews, Allison-Lynn
4ddaec43-0f43-40cd-a191-aa53b0b30f16
Bucchieri, Fabio
d5c6c38a-8b02-4a37-afb0-c272033cb0d2
Arima, Kazuhiko
5998f5fa-9aa8-493c-ac97-716e1ffcfb46
Izuhara, Kenji
78fca599-a635-4357-b0ca-7c03338f1ba5
Holgate, Stephen T.
2e7c17a9-6796-436e-8772-1fe6d2ac5edc
Davies, Donna E.
7de8fdc7-3640-4e3a-aa91-d0e03f990c38
Holloway, John W.
4bbd77e6-c095-445d-a36b-a50a72f6fe1a

Andrews, Allison-Lynn, Bucchieri, Fabio, Arima, Kazuhiko, Izuhara, Kenji, Holgate, Stephen T., Davies, Donna E. and Holloway, John W. (2007) Effect of IL-13 receptor ?2 levels on the biological activity of IL-13 variant R110Q. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 120 (1), 91-97. (doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2007.04.026).

Record type: Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND: IL-13 is a key cytokine associated with the asthmatic phenotype. IL-13 signals via its cognate receptor, a complex of IL-13 receptor (IL-13R) alpha 1 chain with IL-4 receptor alpha; however, a second protein, IL-13Ralpha2, also binds IL-13. Recently a polymorphic variant of IL-13 (R110Q) has been shown to be associated with atopy. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the binding properties of this IL-13 variant to its cognate receptors. METHODS: We used surface plasmon resonance to measure the binding kinetics of R110Q to its receptors. Primary human fibroblasts were grown from endobronchial biopsies obtained from volunteers. Receptor levels were measured by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the binding of R110Q with soluble human IL-13Ralpha1 compared with IL-13 (32 +/- 5 nmol/L and 36 +/- 7 nmol/L, respectively; P = .625). However, a small but significant difference was observed in the binding of R110Q to soluble human IL-13Ralpha2 compared with IL-13 (840 +/- 87 pmol/L and 1.1 +/- .05 nmol/L, respectively; P = .04). We observed that primary human lung fibroblasts expressed different levels of IL-13Ralpha2. Eotaxin release from fibroblasts expressing low IL-13Ralpha2 levels was significantly higher in response to R110Q compared with IL-13. This was not evident in cells that had high baseline IL-13Ralpha2 levels. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that relatively small changes in functional properties of a ligand combined with variation in receptor levels in vivo can result in significant differences in responsiveness. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Expression of R110Q and low IL-13Ralpha2 levels can result in important biological differences that may have clinical relevance in an atopic environment.

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More information

Published date: July 2007
Keywords: asthma, IL-13Ra2, IL-13, polymorphisms

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 44294
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/44294
ISSN: 0091-6749
PURE UUID: cade1d35-e5f0-43a7-aad4-f18a553d5b30
ORCID for John W. Holloway: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9998-0464

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Feb 2007
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:50

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