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Induction programmes in the age of 'corporate culture'

Induction programmes in the age of 'corporate culture'
Induction programmes in the age of 'corporate culture'
Though still viewed as the missing link between recruitment and retention, organisational induction programmes have recently acquired a new function: they can mould the new employee by inducing a positive "first impression" about the organisation and presenting a "caring" company image. Up to now, however, the majority of the induction literature has failed to refer to the political and ethical aspects of this process and analyse the embedded ideological structures and cultural practices through which induction trainers and newcomers construct, reconstruct and deconstruct induction discourses and 'management language'. This paper argues that induction should be treated as a part of an organisational cosmos that is constantly created and re-created, defined and re-defined based on the discursive interactions of its increasingly "sophisticated‟ subjects.
0277-2027
199-231
Daskalaki, Maria
6c5ac39d-95f5-4dc1-98cc-ad2f80b3f0fa
Daskalaki, Maria
6c5ac39d-95f5-4dc1-98cc-ad2f80b3f0fa

Daskalaki, Maria (2000) Induction programmes in the age of 'corporate culture'. Business and Professional Ethics Journal, 19 (3&4), 199-231. (doi:10.2307/27801235).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Though still viewed as the missing link between recruitment and retention, organisational induction programmes have recently acquired a new function: they can mould the new employee by inducing a positive "first impression" about the organisation and presenting a "caring" company image. Up to now, however, the majority of the induction literature has failed to refer to the political and ethical aspects of this process and analyse the embedded ideological structures and cultural practices through which induction trainers and newcomers construct, reconstruct and deconstruct induction discourses and 'management language'. This paper argues that induction should be treated as a part of an organisational cosmos that is constantly created and re-created, defined and re-defined based on the discursive interactions of its increasingly "sophisticated‟ subjects.

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More information

Published date: 2000

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 443138
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/443138
ISSN: 0277-2027
PURE UUID: 7e7adba3-4658-4769-8591-13dae3599743
ORCID for Maria Daskalaki: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7860-1955

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Aug 2020 16:30
Last modified: 09 Sep 2020 01:53

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