The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Sensitivity assessment of bathymetry and choice of tidal constituents on tidal-stream energy resource characterisation in the Gulf of California, Mexico

Sensitivity assessment of bathymetry and choice of tidal constituents on tidal-stream energy resource characterisation in the Gulf of California, Mexico
Sensitivity assessment of bathymetry and choice of tidal constituents on tidal-stream energy resource characterisation in the Gulf of California, Mexico
There has been a significant increase in the number of published tidal-stream energy resource assessments in recent years due to the growing availability of open-source hydrodynamic models, and freely available data for model bathymetry (e.g. GEBCO_2014 and ETOPO) and boundary conditions (e.g. TPXO, FES, EOT). This study examines how the choice of bathymetry and tidal constituents affects the quantification of a tidal-stream energy resource, by conducting sensitivity tests for the Gulf of California. We find that the mean KPD (Kinetic Power Density) and annual mean power are significantly underestimated when using just GEBCO_2014 or ETOPO bathymetry data sources on their own. For the Midriff region, between San Lorenzo and San Esteban Islands (herein the San Lorenzo Passage), the annual mean power potential was estimated to be around 50 MW when using freely available bathymetry data, while the annual mean power increased to ~200 MW when using a bespoke dataset that was a combination of GEBCO and higher-resolution bathymetry provided by CICESE (The Centre for Scientific Research and Higher Education at Ensenada). Current speeds reduce from 2.4 m/s when using high-resolution to around 1.2 m/s and 0.8 m/s when using open source bathymetry products. Finally, we compared the estimated energy using tidal levels predicted from 29 tidal constituents compared with simulations that included just the principal semi-diurnal lunar (M2) and solar (S2) constituents. The annual mean KPD reduced by almost 1/3rd in the San Lorenzo Passage, when just considering M2 and S2 constituents, suggesting that diurnal and higher order harmonic constituents are important for accurate resource assessments in this region.
Annual mean power, Bathymetry, ETOPO, GEBCO, Gulf of California, Mexico, Sensitivity tests, Tidal-stream energy
0141-1187
Mejia-olivares, Carlos Joel
cbd328cb-4742-42fe-8f6e-bb60f04da38e
Haigh, Ivan D.
945ff20a-589c-47b7-b06f-61804367eb2d
Lewis, Matt J.
d7efaf90-369e-4650-9586-e6cf7270265c
Neill, Simon P.
93fea49b-21f9-4202-9908-d4fcd815c544
Mejia-olivares, Carlos Joel
cbd328cb-4742-42fe-8f6e-bb60f04da38e
Haigh, Ivan D.
945ff20a-589c-47b7-b06f-61804367eb2d
Lewis, Matt J.
d7efaf90-369e-4650-9586-e6cf7270265c
Neill, Simon P.
93fea49b-21f9-4202-9908-d4fcd815c544

Mejia-olivares, Carlos Joel, Haigh, Ivan D., Lewis, Matt J. and Neill, Simon P. (2020) Sensitivity assessment of bathymetry and choice of tidal constituents on tidal-stream energy resource characterisation in the Gulf of California, Mexico. Applied Ocean Research, 102, [102281]. (doi:10.1016/j.apor.2020.102281).

Record type: Article

Abstract

There has been a significant increase in the number of published tidal-stream energy resource assessments in recent years due to the growing availability of open-source hydrodynamic models, and freely available data for model bathymetry (e.g. GEBCO_2014 and ETOPO) and boundary conditions (e.g. TPXO, FES, EOT). This study examines how the choice of bathymetry and tidal constituents affects the quantification of a tidal-stream energy resource, by conducting sensitivity tests for the Gulf of California. We find that the mean KPD (Kinetic Power Density) and annual mean power are significantly underestimated when using just GEBCO_2014 or ETOPO bathymetry data sources on their own. For the Midriff region, between San Lorenzo and San Esteban Islands (herein the San Lorenzo Passage), the annual mean power potential was estimated to be around 50 MW when using freely available bathymetry data, while the annual mean power increased to ~200 MW when using a bespoke dataset that was a combination of GEBCO and higher-resolution bathymetry provided by CICESE (The Centre for Scientific Research and Higher Education at Ensenada). Current speeds reduce from 2.4 m/s when using high-resolution to around 1.2 m/s and 0.8 m/s when using open source bathymetry products. Finally, we compared the estimated energy using tidal levels predicted from 29 tidal constituents compared with simulations that included just the principal semi-diurnal lunar (M2) and solar (S2) constituents. The annual mean KPD reduced by almost 1/3rd in the San Lorenzo Passage, when just considering M2 and S2 constituents, suggesting that diurnal and higher order harmonic constituents are important for accurate resource assessments in this region.

Text
Carlos Joel Mejia Olivares Manuscript_R4_clean manuscript FINAL_SOTON - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 3 August 2022.
Request a copy

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 2 July 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 3 August 2020
Published date: 1 September 2020
Keywords: Annual mean power, Bathymetry, ETOPO, GEBCO, Gulf of California, Mexico, Sensitivity tests, Tidal-stream energy

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 443218
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/443218
ISSN: 0141-1187
PURE UUID: a3aa6a28-b40f-4eab-a830-0d6a317617af

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Aug 2020 16:31
Last modified: 25 Nov 2021 18:37

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Carlos Joel Mejia-olivares
Author: Ivan D. Haigh
Author: Matt J. Lewis
Author: Simon P. Neill

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×