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Assessment of low dissipative shock capturing schemes for the compressible Taylor Green vortex

Assessment of low dissipative shock capturing schemes for the compressible Taylor Green vortex
Assessment of low dissipative shock capturing schemes for the compressible Taylor Green vortex
Interactions between shock-waves and turbulence are ubiquitous in high-speed flows of practical aeronautical interest. Recent advances in computational power have made Implicit Large Eddy Simulation (ILES) and Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) feasible tools for investigating the underlying physical mechanisms involved. However, numerical methods for shock-capturing introduce high levels of numerical dissipation to the whole flow-field, making them a poor choice for resolving the small scales of turbulence. In this work the efficacy of a selection of low-dissipative and hybrid Weighted and Targeted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO/TENO) shock-capturing methods is assessed. An extension of the classic subsonic Taylor-Green vortex problem is presented up to Mach 1.25, where compressibility and dilatational dissipation become important. The presence of strong shock-waves is demonstrated, which merge and interact with one another to form complex shock systems. A supersonic test case is then specified, using a Reynolds number of 1600 to ensure a wide range of scales are present to test the numerical schemes. Low-dissipative TENO schemes are found to offer substantial improvements in resolution over established WENO methods for a comparable computational cost.
0001-1452
Lusher, David
dd681c9e-ceae-409b-8153-8248c13a18e5
Sandham, Neil
0024d8cd-c788-4811-a470-57934fbdcf97
Lusher, David
dd681c9e-ceae-409b-8153-8248c13a18e5
Sandham, Neil
0024d8cd-c788-4811-a470-57934fbdcf97

Lusher, David and Sandham, Neil (2020) Assessment of low dissipative shock capturing schemes for the compressible Taylor Green vortex. AIAA Journal. (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Interactions between shock-waves and turbulence are ubiquitous in high-speed flows of practical aeronautical interest. Recent advances in computational power have made Implicit Large Eddy Simulation (ILES) and Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) feasible tools for investigating the underlying physical mechanisms involved. However, numerical methods for shock-capturing introduce high levels of numerical dissipation to the whole flow-field, making them a poor choice for resolving the small scales of turbulence. In this work the efficacy of a selection of low-dissipative and hybrid Weighted and Targeted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO/TENO) shock-capturing methods is assessed. An extension of the classic subsonic Taylor-Green vortex problem is presented up to Mach 1.25, where compressibility and dilatational dissipation become important. The presence of strong shock-waves is demonstrated, which merge and interact with one another to form complex shock systems. A supersonic test case is then specified, using a Reynolds number of 1600 to ensure a wide range of scales are present to test the numerical schemes. Low-dissipative TENO schemes are found to offer substantial improvements in resolution over established WENO methods for a comparable computational cost.

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Lusher AIAAJ 2020 TGV - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 25 August 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 443466
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/443466
ISSN: 0001-1452
PURE UUID: f70c53c9-2ad1-4fb0-9d6b-a25dd76f922e
ORCID for David Lusher: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8874-5290
ORCID for Neil Sandham: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5107-0944

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Aug 2020 16:35
Last modified: 13 Dec 2021 06:14

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Contributors

Author: David Lusher ORCID iD
Author: Neil Sandham ORCID iD

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