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Using biomarkers in acute medicine to prevent hearing loss: should this require specific consent?

Using biomarkers in acute medicine to prevent hearing loss: should this require specific consent?
Using biomarkers in acute medicine to prevent hearing loss: should this require specific consent?
In this round table response, we discuss some of the problems inherent in insisting on specific consent for an activity that needs to happen rapidly as part of a package of care. The Human Tissue Authority (the UK regulator for human tissue and organs) consider that specific consent is mandatory to assess which antibiotics are appropriate on the neonatal unit, but this insistence may actually limit the autonomy which consent aims to promote. While genetic testing to determine which child will react adversely to particular antibiotics has been available clinically for several years, the research proposed here is to assess whether improving the speed of testing allows decisions to be made before treatment starts. Insisting on specific consent before this activity can take place is likely to delay appropriate care in some cases.
genethics, genetic screening/testing, human tissue, informed consent, minors/parental consent
1473-4257
536-537
Coulson-Smith, Peta
e50c7afb-9c34-4c43-a67c-0dc8df14440b
Lucassen, Anneke
2eb85efc-c6e8-4c3f-b963-0290f6c038a5
Coulson-Smith, Peta
e50c7afb-9c34-4c43-a67c-0dc8df14440b
Lucassen, Anneke
2eb85efc-c6e8-4c3f-b963-0290f6c038a5

Coulson-Smith, Peta and Lucassen, Anneke (2020) Using biomarkers in acute medicine to prevent hearing loss: should this require specific consent? Journal of Medical Ethics, 46 (8), 536-537. (doi:10.1136/medethics-2020-106106).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In this round table response, we discuss some of the problems inherent in insisting on specific consent for an activity that needs to happen rapidly as part of a package of care. The Human Tissue Authority (the UK regulator for human tissue and organs) consider that specific consent is mandatory to assess which antibiotics are appropriate on the neonatal unit, but this insistence may actually limit the autonomy which consent aims to promote. While genetic testing to determine which child will react adversely to particular antibiotics has been available clinically for several years, the research proposed here is to assess whether improving the speed of testing allows decisions to be made before treatment starts. Insisting on specific consent before this activity can take place is likely to delay appropriate care in some cases.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 11 March 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 13 July 2020
Published date: August 2020
Keywords: genethics, genetic screening/testing, human tissue, informed consent, minors/parental consent

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 443495
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/443495
ISSN: 1473-4257
PURE UUID: 4d07663a-ce52-442a-bad6-392432f9e188
ORCID for Anneke Lucassen: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3324-4338

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Aug 2020 16:37
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:45

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