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Trends in components of sea level around the English Channel

Trends in components of sea level around the English Channel
Trends in components of sea level around the English Channel
The longest available records of hourly sea level data have been analysed for six ports around the English Channel. The quality of the data is extremely variable with the longest and most reliable records belonging to Brest and Newlyn. A separate analysis of the components of sea level: mean sea level, tides and meteorological residuals (surges), is used. Results show a general increase in mean sea level throughout the period of observation. The various tidal constituents show interesting local short-term variations in amplitude and phase but no longterm trends. There is no evidence of an increase in weather effects on sea levels over the period analysed. De-trended sea level and pressure values show annual sea level fall as annual air pressures increase, as expected for the inverse barometer response. Meteorological residuals were compared to North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index values. The correlations are in general very small, especially for the annual mean NAO values. However correlations are slightly more apparent for the annual winter mean NAO values.
9728558090
107-114
EUROCOAST
Araujo, I.
3fb34735-76aa-4b54-ad17-38faf7c79b48
Pugh, D.
ec256ec5-072b-4c4b-8ced-471c277803ff
Collins, M.
3b70278b-0004-45e0-b3c9-0debdf0a9351
Araujo, I.
3fb34735-76aa-4b54-ad17-38faf7c79b48
Pugh, D.
ec256ec5-072b-4c4b-8ced-471c277803ff
Collins, M.
3b70278b-0004-45e0-b3c9-0debdf0a9351

Araujo, I., Pugh, D. and Collins, M. (2002) Trends in components of sea level around the English Channel. In Littoral 2002: The Changing Coast. EUROCOAST. pp. 107-114 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The longest available records of hourly sea level data have been analysed for six ports around the English Channel. The quality of the data is extremely variable with the longest and most reliable records belonging to Brest and Newlyn. A separate analysis of the components of sea level: mean sea level, tides and meteorological residuals (surges), is used. Results show a general increase in mean sea level throughout the period of observation. The various tidal constituents show interesting local short-term variations in amplitude and phase but no longterm trends. There is no evidence of an increase in weather effects on sea levels over the period analysed. De-trended sea level and pressure values show annual sea level fall as annual air pressures increase, as expected for the inverse barometer response. Meteorological residuals were compared to North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index values. The correlations are in general very small, especially for the annual mean NAO values. However correlations are slightly more apparent for the annual winter mean NAO values.

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Published date: 2002
Venue - Dates: conference; 2002-09-22; 2002-09-26, Porto, Portugal, 2002-09-21 - 2002-09-25

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 44350
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/44350
ISBN: 9728558090
PURE UUID: 125e7404-8b55-4635-b29c-ba92143f93cd

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Date deposited: 27 Feb 2007
Last modified: 24 Jul 2020 16:32

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Contributors

Author: I. Araujo
Author: D. Pugh
Author: M. Collins

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