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The Pixelated Person: Humanity in the Grip of Algorithmic Personalisation

The Pixelated Person: Humanity in the Grip of Algorithmic Personalisation
The Pixelated Person: Humanity in the Grip of Algorithmic Personalisation
This is the introductory chapter to the edited collection on 'Data-Driven Personalisation in Markets, Politics and Law' (Cambridge University Press, 2021) that explores the emergent pervasive phenomenon of algorithmic prediction of human preferences, responses and likely behaviours in numerous social domains – ranging from personalised advertising and political microtargeting to precision medicine, personalised pricing and predictive policing and sentencing. This chapter reflects on such human-focused use of predictive technology, first, by situating it within a general framework of profiling and defends data-driven individual and group profiling against some critiques of stereotyping, on the basis that our cognition of the external environment is necessarily reliant on relevant abstractions or non-universal generalisations. The second set of reflections centres around the philosophical tradition of empiricism as a basis of knowledge or truth production, and uses this tradition to critique data-driven profiling and personalisation practices in its numerous manifestations.
3-36
Cambridge University Press
Kohl, Uta
813ff335-441f-4027-801b-4e6fc48409c3
Kohl, Uta
Eisler, Jacob
Kohl, Uta
813ff335-441f-4027-801b-4e6fc48409c3
Kohl, Uta
Eisler, Jacob

Kohl, Uta (2021) The Pixelated Person: Humanity in the Grip of Algorithmic Personalisation. In, Kohl, Uta and Eisler, Jacob (eds.) Data-Driven Personalisation in Markets, Politics and Law. Cambridge University Press, pp. 3-36. (doi:10.1017/9781108891325.003).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

This is the introductory chapter to the edited collection on 'Data-Driven Personalisation in Markets, Politics and Law' (Cambridge University Press, 2021) that explores the emergent pervasive phenomenon of algorithmic prediction of human preferences, responses and likely behaviours in numerous social domains – ranging from personalised advertising and political microtargeting to precision medicine, personalised pricing and predictive policing and sentencing. This chapter reflects on such human-focused use of predictive technology, first, by situating it within a general framework of profiling and defends data-driven individual and group profiling against some critiques of stereotyping, on the basis that our cognition of the external environment is necessarily reliant on relevant abstractions or non-universal generalisations. The second set of reflections centres around the philosophical tradition of empiricism as a basis of knowledge or truth production, and uses this tradition to critique data-driven profiling and personalisation practices in its numerous manifestations.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 2020
Published date: 1 July 2021

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 443578
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/443578
PURE UUID: 35ff58c8-ec65-43df-829c-1ab9a75bcfe8
ORCID for Uta Kohl: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8616-9469

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Sep 2020 01:47
Last modified: 15 Sep 2022 01:57

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Contributors

Author: Uta Kohl ORCID iD
Editor: Uta Kohl
Editor: Jacob Eisler

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