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Effect of different typical high speed train pantograph recess configurations on aerodynamic noise

Effect of different typical high speed train pantograph recess configurations on aerodynamic noise
Effect of different typical high speed train pantograph recess configurations on aerodynamic noise
For high-speed trains, the aerodynamic noise becomes an essential consideration in the train design. The pantograph and pantograph recess are recognised as important sources of aerodynamic noise. This paper studies the flow characteristics and noise contributions of three typical high-speed train roof configurations, namely a cavity, a ramped cavity and a flat roof with side insulation plates. The Improved Delayed Detached-Eddy Simulation approach is used for the flow calculations and the Ffowcs Williams & Hawkings aeroacoustic analogy is used for far-field acoustic predictions. Simulations are presented for a simplified train body at 1/10 scale and 300 km/h with these three roof configurations. In each case, two simplified pantographs (one retracted and one raised) are located on the roof. Analysis of the flow fields obtained from numerical simulations clearly shows the influence of the train roof configuration on the flow behaviour, including flow separations, reattachment and vortex shedding, which are potential noise sources. A highly unsteady flow occurs downstream when the train roof has a cavity or ramped cavity due to flow separation at the cavity trailing edge, while vortical flow is generated by the side insulation plates. For the ramped cavity configuration, moderately large pressure fluctuations appear on the cavity outside walls in the upstream region due to unsteady flow from the upstream edge of the plate. The raised pantograph, roof cavity, and ramped cavity are identified as the dominant noise sources. When the retracted pantograph is located in the ramped roof cavity, its noise contribution is less important. Furthermore, the insulation plates also generate tonal components in the noise spectra. Of the three configurations considered, the roof cavity configuration radiates the least noise at the side receiver in terms of A-weighted level.
Aeroacoustics, Cavity flow, FW-H, High-speed train, IDDES, Pantograph, Pantograph recess
0954-4097
Kim, Hogun
59edd0de-2b60-4583-a550-424384a76732
Hu, Zhiwei
dd985844-1e6b-44ba-9e1d-fa57c6c88d65
Thompson, David
bca37fd3-d692-4779-b663-5916b01edae5
Kim, Hogun
59edd0de-2b60-4583-a550-424384a76732
Hu, Zhiwei
dd985844-1e6b-44ba-9e1d-fa57c6c88d65
Thompson, David
bca37fd3-d692-4779-b663-5916b01edae5

Kim, Hogun, Hu, Zhiwei and Thompson, David (2020) Effect of different typical high speed train pantograph recess configurations on aerodynamic noise. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part F: Journal of Rail and Rapid Transit. (doi:10.1177/0954409720947516).

Record type: Article

Abstract

For high-speed trains, the aerodynamic noise becomes an essential consideration in the train design. The pantograph and pantograph recess are recognised as important sources of aerodynamic noise. This paper studies the flow characteristics and noise contributions of three typical high-speed train roof configurations, namely a cavity, a ramped cavity and a flat roof with side insulation plates. The Improved Delayed Detached-Eddy Simulation approach is used for the flow calculations and the Ffowcs Williams & Hawkings aeroacoustic analogy is used for far-field acoustic predictions. Simulations are presented for a simplified train body at 1/10 scale and 300 km/h with these three roof configurations. In each case, two simplified pantographs (one retracted and one raised) are located on the roof. Analysis of the flow fields obtained from numerical simulations clearly shows the influence of the train roof configuration on the flow behaviour, including flow separations, reattachment and vortex shedding, which are potential noise sources. A highly unsteady flow occurs downstream when the train roof has a cavity or ramped cavity due to flow separation at the cavity trailing edge, while vortical flow is generated by the side insulation plates. For the ramped cavity configuration, moderately large pressure fluctuations appear on the cavity outside walls in the upstream region due to unsteady flow from the upstream edge of the plate. The raised pantograph, roof cavity, and ramped cavity are identified as the dominant noise sources. When the retracted pantograph is located in the ramped roof cavity, its noise contribution is less important. Furthermore, the insulation plates also generate tonal components in the noise spectra. Of the three configurations considered, the roof cavity configuration radiates the least noise at the side receiver in terms of A-weighted level.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 10 August 2020
Keywords: Aeroacoustics, Cavity flow, FW-H, High-speed train, IDDES, Pantograph, Pantograph recess

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 443594
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/443594
ISSN: 0954-4097
PURE UUID: d0765452-a7da-4d25-9190-c859f2d697da
ORCID for Hogun Kim: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6887-8483
ORCID for David Thompson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7964-5906

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Date deposited: 03 Sep 2020 16:30
Last modified: 28 Apr 2022 01:41

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Contributors

Author: Hogun Kim ORCID iD
Author: Zhiwei Hu
Author: David Thompson ORCID iD

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