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Access over ownership: case studies of Libraries of Things

Access over ownership: case studies of Libraries of Things
Access over ownership: case studies of Libraries of Things
Over the last decade there has been increasing interest in the concept of the sharing economy, which replaces the focus on individual ownership with a focus on access to goods and services through borrowing, hiring or sharing. This paper investigates the efficacy of extending the library concept to include more items, such as those that are used infrequently. The aim is to explore how Libraries of Things (LoTs) operate and the barriers and opportunities to broaden their appeal, reach and sustainability. This study adopts a multiple case study method to provide a snapshot of six LoTs in the UK. Findings indicate that all LoTs shared common environmental and social values, with the most prevalent values being to use the library concept to reduce resource use and waste, and enable more equitable access to goods. All relied on volunteers and public support, in the form of free or discounted space and none were yet economically self-sufficient. This poses important questions about the future for LoTs and whether they could, or even should, transition towards the mainstream in order to make a more substantive contribution to creating a more socially equitable and environmentally sustainable economy.
Access-based consumption, Circular economy, Library of Things, Product Service Systems, Sharing Economy, Sustainable Business Models, collaborative consumption
2071-1050
Baden, Denise
daad83b9-c537-4d3c-bab6-548b841f23b5
Peattie, Ken
e4570031-c6f8-4da8-af28-63b506600d1c
Oke, Adekunle
e4337323-88c1-4533-8536-2eb72615918b
Baden, Denise
daad83b9-c537-4d3c-bab6-548b841f23b5
Peattie, Ken
e4570031-c6f8-4da8-af28-63b506600d1c
Oke, Adekunle
e4337323-88c1-4533-8536-2eb72615918b

Baden, Denise, Peattie, Ken and Oke, Adekunle (2020) Access over ownership: case studies of Libraries of Things. Sustainability, 12 (17), [7180]. (doi:10.3390/su12177180).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Over the last decade there has been increasing interest in the concept of the sharing economy, which replaces the focus on individual ownership with a focus on access to goods and services through borrowing, hiring or sharing. This paper investigates the efficacy of extending the library concept to include more items, such as those that are used infrequently. The aim is to explore how Libraries of Things (LoTs) operate and the barriers and opportunities to broaden their appeal, reach and sustainability. This study adopts a multiple case study method to provide a snapshot of six LoTs in the UK. Findings indicate that all LoTs shared common environmental and social values, with the most prevalent values being to use the library concept to reduce resource use and waste, and enable more equitable access to goods. All relied on volunteers and public support, in the form of free or discounted space and none were yet economically self-sufficient. This poses important questions about the future for LoTs and whether they could, or even should, transition towards the mainstream in order to make a more substantive contribution to creating a more socially equitable and environmentally sustainable economy.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 31 August 2020
Published date: 2 September 2020
Keywords: Access-based consumption, Circular economy, Library of Things, Product Service Systems, Sharing Economy, Sustainable Business Models, collaborative consumption

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 443610
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/443610
ISSN: 2071-1050
PURE UUID: 6cbfbc6d-f870-43cc-a5a2-a75e03d057bd
ORCID for Denise Baden: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2736-4483

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Sep 2020 16:31
Last modified: 28 Apr 2022 01:43

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Contributors

Author: Denise Baden ORCID iD
Author: Ken Peattie
Author: Adekunle Oke

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