The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Alcohol use disorder and the liver

Alcohol use disorder and the liver
Alcohol use disorder and the liver

Alcohol use disorders (AUD) cause a range of physical harms, but the major cause of alcohol-related mortality is alcohol-related liver disease (ALD), in some countries accounting for almost 90% of alcohol-related deaths. The risk of ALD has an exponential relationship with increasing alcohol consumption, but is also associated with genetic factors, other life-style factors and social deprivation. ALD includes a spectrum of progressive pathology, from liver steatosis to fibrosis and liver cirrhosis. There are no specific treatments for liver cirrhosis, but abstinence from alcohol is key to limit progression of the disease. Over time, cirrhosis can progress (often silently) to decompensated cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Liver transplantation may be suitable for patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis and may also be used as a curative intervention for HCC, but only for a few selected patients, and complete abstinence is a prerequisite. Patients with AUD are also at risk of developing alcoholic hepatitis, which has a high mortality and limited evidence for effective therapies. There is a strong evidence base for the effectiveness of psychosocial and pharmacological interventions for AUD, but very few of these have been trialled in patients with comorbid ALD. Integrated specialist alcohol and hepatology collaborations are required to develop interventions and pathways for patients with ALD and ongoing AUD.

alcohol use disorder, Alcohol-related liver disease, cirrhosis, hepatitis, hepatocellular carcinoma, relapse prevention
0965-2140
Buchanan, Ryan
9499f713-f684-4046-be29-83cd9d6f834d
Sinclair, Julia M.A.
be3e54d5-c6da-4950-b0ba-3cb8cdcab13c
Buchanan, Ryan
9499f713-f684-4046-be29-83cd9d6f834d
Sinclair, Julia M.A.
be3e54d5-c6da-4950-b0ba-3cb8cdcab13c

Buchanan, Ryan and Sinclair, Julia M.A. (2020) Alcohol use disorder and the liver. Addiction. (doi:10.1111/add.15204).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Alcohol use disorders (AUD) cause a range of physical harms, but the major cause of alcohol-related mortality is alcohol-related liver disease (ALD), in some countries accounting for almost 90% of alcohol-related deaths. The risk of ALD has an exponential relationship with increasing alcohol consumption, but is also associated with genetic factors, other life-style factors and social deprivation. ALD includes a spectrum of progressive pathology, from liver steatosis to fibrosis and liver cirrhosis. There are no specific treatments for liver cirrhosis, but abstinence from alcohol is key to limit progression of the disease. Over time, cirrhosis can progress (often silently) to decompensated cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Liver transplantation may be suitable for patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis and may also be used as a curative intervention for HCC, but only for a few selected patients, and complete abstinence is a prerequisite. Patients with AUD are also at risk of developing alcoholic hepatitis, which has a high mortality and limited evidence for effective therapies. There is a strong evidence base for the effectiveness of psychosocial and pharmacological interventions for AUD, but very few of these have been trialled in patients with comorbid ALD. Integrated specialist alcohol and hepatology collaborations are required to develop interventions and pathways for patients with ALD and ongoing AUD.

Text
add.15204 - Version of Record
Download (5MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 17 July 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 25 July 2020
Keywords: alcohol use disorder, Alcohol-related liver disease, cirrhosis, hepatitis, hepatocellular carcinoma, relapse prevention

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 443692
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/443692
ISSN: 0965-2140
PURE UUID: 01246ba5-b1af-4c60-bb04-b948d39a5db6
ORCID for Julia M.A. Sinclair: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1905-2025

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Sep 2020 16:30
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 01:41

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×