The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Early-life inflammatory events: a risk factor for hearing loss in later life

Early-life inflammatory events: a risk factor for hearing loss in later life
Early-life inflammatory events: a risk factor for hearing loss in later life
Age-related hearing loss is a progressive, degenerative condition that affects 50% of individuals over 70. Hearing loss is one of the greatest risk factors for dementia. Lifestyle including smoking, diet and medical history are all associated with susceptibility to loss of hearing with age. We hypothesise that the association between early-life inflammatory events and hearing loss is due to priming of innate immune cells in the auditory system.

Otitis media is a chronic early-life inflammatory condition of the middle ear that is associated with recurrent infection. Using a mouse model for otitis media, we are investigating how immune cells in the auditory pathway respond in otitis media and how this is altered when overlaid with an infection (Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae - NTHi).

Immunohistochemical staining identified that otitis media caused increased microglial activation in the auditory system. When overlaid with infection, this response was exacerbated as evidenced by increased Il-1 production and greater susceptibility to infection with NTHi.

These results identify that pre-existing middle ear inflammation alters the phenotype of innate immune cells in the auditory system resulting in a heightened inflammatory response to an additional insult. This could lead to greater damage in the auditory pathway and subsequent hearing loss.
Hough, Kate
4ab6ce34-81be-4bff-bdc1-bdd22bbb0ace
Sanderson, Alan Peter
79d72ecf-7722-4a39-be5f-a041ba423c2b
Watson, Evie
07ce605d-941d-4cd4-b06a-d5e9b41acc13
Hood, Derek W.
f9ec1f2c-0867-4cc3-8157-1f739cb1f774
Verschuur, Carl
5e15ee1c-3a44-4dbe-ad43-ec3b50111e41
Newman, Tracey
322290cb-2e9c-445d-a047-00b1bea39a25
Hough, Kate
4ab6ce34-81be-4bff-bdc1-bdd22bbb0ace
Sanderson, Alan Peter
79d72ecf-7722-4a39-be5f-a041ba423c2b
Watson, Evie
07ce605d-941d-4cd4-b06a-d5e9b41acc13
Hood, Derek W.
f9ec1f2c-0867-4cc3-8157-1f739cb1f774
Verschuur, Carl
5e15ee1c-3a44-4dbe-ad43-ec3b50111e41
Newman, Tracey
322290cb-2e9c-445d-a047-00b1bea39a25

Hough, Kate, Sanderson, Alan Peter, Watson, Evie, Hood, Derek W., Verschuur, Carl and Newman, Tracey (2019) Early-life inflammatory events: a risk factor for hearing loss in later life. 17th Southampton Neurosciences conference: The Neuroscience of Lifelong Illness.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

Age-related hearing loss is a progressive, degenerative condition that affects 50% of individuals over 70. Hearing loss is one of the greatest risk factors for dementia. Lifestyle including smoking, diet and medical history are all associated with susceptibility to loss of hearing with age. We hypothesise that the association between early-life inflammatory events and hearing loss is due to priming of innate immune cells in the auditory system.

Otitis media is a chronic early-life inflammatory condition of the middle ear that is associated with recurrent infection. Using a mouse model for otitis media, we are investigating how immune cells in the auditory pathway respond in otitis media and how this is altered when overlaid with an infection (Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae - NTHi).

Immunohistochemical staining identified that otitis media caused increased microglial activation in the auditory system. When overlaid with infection, this response was exacerbated as evidenced by increased Il-1 production and greater susceptibility to infection with NTHi.

These results identify that pre-existing middle ear inflammation alters the phenotype of innate immune cells in the auditory system resulting in a heightened inflammatory response to an additional insult. This could lead to greater damage in the auditory pathway and subsequent hearing loss.

Text
Kate Hough - SONG Poster 2019
Download (3MB)

More information

Published date: 19 September 2019
Venue - Dates: 17th Southampton Neurosciences conference: The Neuroscience of Lifelong Illness, 2019-09-19

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 443713
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/443713
PURE UUID: e3e03bf1-5a70-44bd-9862-32c0984fa14d
ORCID for Kate Hough: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5160-2517
ORCID for Tracey Newman: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3727-9258

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Sep 2020 16:34
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:32

Export record

Contributors

Author: Kate Hough ORCID iD
Author: Alan Peter Sanderson
Author: Evie Watson
Author: Derek W. Hood
Author: Carl Verschuur
Author: Tracey Newman ORCID iD

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×