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Different laboratory abnormalities in COVID-19 patients with hypertension or diabetes

Different laboratory abnormalities in COVID-19 patients with hypertension or diabetes
Different laboratory abnormalities in COVID-19 patients with hypertension or diabetes
The pandemic of COVID-19 has placed an enormous burden on health authorities across the world. The symptoms of COVID-19 range from mild to life-threatening. Those who are elderly or have pre-existing health issues like hypertension or diabetes are more likely to develop severe disease. To understand why patients with hypertension and diabetes yield poorer clinical outcomes than those without, 99 patients with laboratory-confirmed moderate or severe COVID-19 were recruited and factors that associate with their preexisting health issues were explored using appropriate statistical methods. In our analysis, we found HRCT peak scores for hypertensive or diabetic COVID-19 patients were higher compared to those without (P < 0.05), which confirmed an increased disease severity in COVID-19 patients with hypertension or diabetes. Most interestingly, in laboratory findings on admission, we found white blood cell counts (P = 0.035), neutrophil counts (P = 0.045), D-dimer (P = 0.017) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (P = 0.007) were all increased in hypertensive COVID-19 patients compared to non-hypertensive ones; while lymphocyte count was not significantly changed in hypertensive COVID-19 patients (P = 0.260). In contrast, there was a significant decrease in lymphocyte count in COVID-19 patients with diabetes compared with those without (P = 0.019); while changes in white blood cell counts, neutrophil counts, D-dimer and LDH were not significant (P > 0.05) in COVID-19 patients with diabetes. These results suggest different mechanisms exist for hypertension or diabetes as risk factors for severe cases of COVID-19, which might shed light on future mechanistic studies.
1674-0769
1-4
Wu, Xiaojun
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Wang, Tong
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Zhou, Yilu
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Liu, Xiaofan
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Zhou, Hong
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Lu, Yang
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Tan, Weijun
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Yuan, Mingli
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Ding, Xuhong
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Zou, Jinjing
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Li, Ruiyun
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Liu, Hailing
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Ewing, Robert
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Hu, Yi
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Nie, Hanxiang
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Wang, Yihua
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Wu, Xiaojun
74358f53-f32d-43a9-8bfa-f2e760e31b66
Wang, Tong
5af201b9-b6f0-41ef-af02-1f0510f91d4f
Zhou, Yilu
1878565d-39e6-467d-a027-7320bf4cdaf2
Liu, Xiaofan
7dbd5651-5c2c-4c2b-9fd2-669c54dc6a85
Zhou, Hong
8db96562-fa25-4d28-87d2-dcb6f46c1cd9
Lu, Yang
83b5b73e-0bf8-47d8-8dbb-fadb7c7d16d9
Tan, Weijun
ecf3ff59-8d1b-46bb-802c-30e661110bc1
Yuan, Mingli
09863704-7fac-49db-9be3-81585b0898f5
Ding, Xuhong
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Zou, Jinjing
eaa70dc6-ed43-4dca-b279-f0fa318ee808
Li, Ruiyun
f2d2f526-4a78-4ea9-8173-2fe50b275725
Liu, Hailing
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Ewing, Robert
022c5b04-da20-4e55-8088-44d0dc9935ae
Hu, Yi
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Nie, Hanxiang
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Wang, Yihua
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Wu, Xiaojun, Wang, Tong, Zhou, Yilu, Liu, Xiaofan, Zhou, Hong, Lu, Yang, Tan, Weijun, Yuan, Mingli, Ding, Xuhong, Zou, Jinjing, Li, Ruiyun, Liu, Hailing, Ewing, Robert, Hu, Yi, Nie, Hanxiang and Wang, Yihua (2020) Different laboratory abnormalities in COVID-19 patients with hypertension or diabetes. Virologica Sinica, 1-4. (doi:10.1007/s12250-020-00296-1).

Record type: Letter

Abstract

The pandemic of COVID-19 has placed an enormous burden on health authorities across the world. The symptoms of COVID-19 range from mild to life-threatening. Those who are elderly or have pre-existing health issues like hypertension or diabetes are more likely to develop severe disease. To understand why patients with hypertension and diabetes yield poorer clinical outcomes than those without, 99 patients with laboratory-confirmed moderate or severe COVID-19 were recruited and factors that associate with their preexisting health issues were explored using appropriate statistical methods. In our analysis, we found HRCT peak scores for hypertensive or diabetic COVID-19 patients were higher compared to those without (P < 0.05), which confirmed an increased disease severity in COVID-19 patients with hypertension or diabetes. Most interestingly, in laboratory findings on admission, we found white blood cell counts (P = 0.035), neutrophil counts (P = 0.045), D-dimer (P = 0.017) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (P = 0.007) were all increased in hypertensive COVID-19 patients compared to non-hypertensive ones; while lymphocyte count was not significantly changed in hypertensive COVID-19 patients (P = 0.260). In contrast, there was a significant decrease in lymphocyte count in COVID-19 patients with diabetes compared with those without (P = 0.019); while changes in white blood cell counts, neutrophil counts, D-dimer and LDH were not significant (P > 0.05) in COVID-19 patients with diabetes. These results suggest different mechanisms exist for hypertension or diabetes as risk factors for severe cases of COVID-19, which might shed light on future mechanistic studies.

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Lab findings in COVID-updated - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 31 August 2021.
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Original AM - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 31 August 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 30 September 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 443742
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/443742
ISSN: 1674-0769
PURE UUID: 82d2fe40-1076-4f7c-9721-181d166f4e8c
ORCID for Robert Ewing: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6510-4001
ORCID for Yihua Wang: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5561-0648

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Sep 2020 16:47
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:25

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