The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Corroborating µCT and histological data to provide novel insight into the biological response to cochlear implantation at the electrode-tissue interface

Corroborating µCT and histological data to provide novel insight into the biological response to cochlear implantation at the electrode-tissue interface
Corroborating µCT and histological data to provide novel insight into the biological response to cochlear implantation at the electrode-tissue interface
Cochlear implants are the most successful neuro-prostheses. They restore hearing by replacing the function of damaged sensory cells inside the cochlea (hearing part of the inner ear). Direct stimulation of the auditory nerve is driven through current generated at electrodes inserted into the cochlea. Despite the success of cochlear implants some individuals underperform or fail i.e. do not achieve the anticipated benefits. A significant proportion of the failures are not due to hardware or surgical factors but may also be due to the biological response at the electrode-tissue interface. As availability of human tissue to investigate the tissue response to cochlear implantation is limited, there is great need for effective in vivo models. We have established a mouse model to investigate the response at the electrode-tissue interface with the aim of understanding how the response to the implant may alter hearing performance, and how this is altered by different materials coating the array. Optimally designed, functional, electrode arrays have been surgically implanted into mice through the round window of the cochlea.

µCT imaging and visualisation has been used to obtain 3D structural information about the cochlea pre-implantation and to visualise the position of array to validate surgical technique post-implantation. Further work will involve implanting and recovering the mice then µCT imaging immediately after culling to visualise any soft tissue damage caused by electrode insertion. The overall aim is to corroborate high resolution µCT images of the mouse cochlea post-implantation with in-depth histological analysis of the tissue to provide essential insight into the biological response at the CI-tissue interface.
Hough, Kate
4ab6ce34-81be-4bff-bdc1-bdd22bbb0ace
Anderson, Lucy
efaa3028-3a49-4ad2-9a4b-9ca4f3ccf9c2
Katsamenis, Orestis L.
8553e7c3-d860-4b7a-a883-abf6c0c4b438
Tourrel, Guillaume
b72a9281-7875-4cf7-84f6-6812521198dd
Chatelet, David
6371fd7a-e274-4738-9ccb-3dd4dab32928
Verschuur, Carl
5e15ee1c-3a44-4dbe-ad43-ec3b50111e41
Newman, Tracey
322290cb-2e9c-445d-a047-00b1bea39a25
Hough, Kate
4ab6ce34-81be-4bff-bdc1-bdd22bbb0ace
Anderson, Lucy
efaa3028-3a49-4ad2-9a4b-9ca4f3ccf9c2
Katsamenis, Orestis L.
8553e7c3-d860-4b7a-a883-abf6c0c4b438
Tourrel, Guillaume
b72a9281-7875-4cf7-84f6-6812521198dd
Chatelet, David
6371fd7a-e274-4738-9ccb-3dd4dab32928
Verschuur, Carl
5e15ee1c-3a44-4dbe-ad43-ec3b50111e41
Newman, Tracey
322290cb-2e9c-445d-a047-00b1bea39a25

Hough, Kate, Anderson, Lucy, Katsamenis, Orestis L., Tourrel, Guillaume, Chatelet, David, Verschuur, Carl and Newman, Tracey (2020) Corroborating µCT and histological data to provide novel insight into the biological response to cochlear implantation at the electrode-tissue interface. Tomography for Scientific Advancement - 10th Edition, Online.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

Cochlear implants are the most successful neuro-prostheses. They restore hearing by replacing the function of damaged sensory cells inside the cochlea (hearing part of the inner ear). Direct stimulation of the auditory nerve is driven through current generated at electrodes inserted into the cochlea. Despite the success of cochlear implants some individuals underperform or fail i.e. do not achieve the anticipated benefits. A significant proportion of the failures are not due to hardware or surgical factors but may also be due to the biological response at the electrode-tissue interface. As availability of human tissue to investigate the tissue response to cochlear implantation is limited, there is great need for effective in vivo models. We have established a mouse model to investigate the response at the electrode-tissue interface with the aim of understanding how the response to the implant may alter hearing performance, and how this is altered by different materials coating the array. Optimally designed, functional, electrode arrays have been surgically implanted into mice through the round window of the cochlea.

µCT imaging and visualisation has been used to obtain 3D structural information about the cochlea pre-implantation and to visualise the position of array to validate surgical technique post-implantation. Further work will involve implanting and recovering the mice then µCT imaging immediately after culling to visualise any soft tissue damage caused by electrode insertion. The overall aim is to corroborate high resolution µCT images of the mouse cochlea post-implantation with in-depth histological analysis of the tissue to provide essential insight into the biological response at the CI-tissue interface.

Slideshow
HoughKate - TOSCA 2020
Download (59MB)

More information

Published date: 3 September 2020
Venue - Dates: Tomography for Scientific Advancement - 10th Edition, Online, 2020-09-03

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 443745
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/443745
PURE UUID: bee75afc-de41-4173-a2ab-da5328b2cc51
ORCID for Kate Hough: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5160-2517
ORCID for Orestis L. Katsamenis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4367-4147
ORCID for Tracey Newman: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3727-9258

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Sep 2020 16:47
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:32

Export record

Contributors

Author: Kate Hough ORCID iD
Author: Lucy Anderson
Author: Guillaume Tourrel
Author: David Chatelet
Author: Carl Verschuur
Author: Tracey Newman ORCID iD

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×