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Gamma-linolenic and pinolenic acids exert anti-inflammatory effects in cultured human endothelial cells through their elongation products

Gamma-linolenic and pinolenic acids exert anti-inflammatory effects in cultured human endothelial cells through their elongation products
Gamma-linolenic and pinolenic acids exert anti-inflammatory effects in cultured human endothelial cells through their elongation products


Scope

Omega‐3 fatty acids (FAs) from oily fish reduce cardiovascular disease. This may be partly due to modulation of endothelial cell (EC) inflammation. Fish stocks are declining and there is a need for sustainable alternative FAs with cardiovascular benefits. Gamma‐linolenic acid (GLA) and pinolenic acid (PLA) are plant‐derived FAs which could fulfil this role.
Methods and results

We examined the effects of GLA and PLA on EC inflammation. EA.hy926 cells were exposed GLA and PLA prior to stimulation with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‐α. GLA and PLA were incorporated into ECs, resulting in increases in long‐chain derivatives produced by elongase 5, dihomo‐gamma‐linolenic acid (DGLA) and eicosatrienoic acid (ETA). Both GLA and PLA (50 μM) decreased production of soluble ICAM‐1 (sICAM‐1), MCP‐1 and RANTES. However, decreases in these mediators were not seen after pre‐treatment with GLA or PLA in elongase 5 silenced EA.hy926 cells. DGLA and ETA (10 μM) decreased EC production of sICAM‐1, MCP‐1, RANTES and IL‐6. All FAs reduced adhesion of THP‐1 monocytes to EA.hy926 cells. Both PLA (50 μM) and ETA (10 μM) decreased NFκBp65 phosphorylation.
Conclusion

These effects suggest potential for GLA and PLA and their long‐chain derivatives, DGLA and ETA, as sustainable anti‐inflammatory alternatives to fish‐derived FAs.

endothelial cells, gamma-linolenic acid, inflammation, pinolenic acid, polyunsaturated fatty acids
1613-4125
Baker, Ella
7cd5b762-d7d7-4584-b9a7-dba555085440
Valenzuela, Carina Alejandra
1a12a9b9-6504-4392-90c5-246644b0ad5c
van Dooremalen, Wies
cf6e4596-5019-4296-984d-e2bffd9ef44a
Martínez-Fernández, Leyre
f071fe2d-2d4a-46bc-9fa1-93d1b2cc8d97
Yaqoob, Parveen
42f061f8-c05f-4c16-85ad-81cecad47a51
Miles, Elizabeth
20332899-ecdb-4214-95bc-922dde36d416
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Baker, Ella
7cd5b762-d7d7-4584-b9a7-dba555085440
Valenzuela, Carina Alejandra
1a12a9b9-6504-4392-90c5-246644b0ad5c
van Dooremalen, Wies
cf6e4596-5019-4296-984d-e2bffd9ef44a
Martínez-Fernández, Leyre
f071fe2d-2d4a-46bc-9fa1-93d1b2cc8d97
Yaqoob, Parveen
42f061f8-c05f-4c16-85ad-81cecad47a51
Miles, Elizabeth
20332899-ecdb-4214-95bc-922dde36d416
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6

Baker, Ella, Valenzuela, Carina Alejandra, van Dooremalen, Wies, Martínez-Fernández, Leyre, Yaqoob, Parveen, Miles, Elizabeth and Calder, Philip (2020) Gamma-linolenic and pinolenic acids exert anti-inflammatory effects in cultured human endothelial cells through their elongation products. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, 64 (20), [2000382]. (doi:10.1002/mnfr.202000382).

Record type: Article

Abstract



Scope

Omega‐3 fatty acids (FAs) from oily fish reduce cardiovascular disease. This may be partly due to modulation of endothelial cell (EC) inflammation. Fish stocks are declining and there is a need for sustainable alternative FAs with cardiovascular benefits. Gamma‐linolenic acid (GLA) and pinolenic acid (PLA) are plant‐derived FAs which could fulfil this role.
Methods and results

We examined the effects of GLA and PLA on EC inflammation. EA.hy926 cells were exposed GLA and PLA prior to stimulation with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‐α. GLA and PLA were incorporated into ECs, resulting in increases in long‐chain derivatives produced by elongase 5, dihomo‐gamma‐linolenic acid (DGLA) and eicosatrienoic acid (ETA). Both GLA and PLA (50 μM) decreased production of soluble ICAM‐1 (sICAM‐1), MCP‐1 and RANTES. However, decreases in these mediators were not seen after pre‐treatment with GLA or PLA in elongase 5 silenced EA.hy926 cells. DGLA and ETA (10 μM) decreased EC production of sICAM‐1, MCP‐1, RANTES and IL‐6. All FAs reduced adhesion of THP‐1 monocytes to EA.hy926 cells. Both PLA (50 μM) and ETA (10 μM) decreased NFκBp65 phosphorylation.
Conclusion

These effects suggest potential for GLA and PLA and their long‐chain derivatives, DGLA and ETA, as sustainable anti‐inflammatory alternatives to fish‐derived FAs.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 1 September 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 8 September 2020
Keywords: endothelial cells, gamma-linolenic acid, inflammation, pinolenic acid, polyunsaturated fatty acids

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 443768
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/443768
ISSN: 1613-4125
PURE UUID: 48d83962-2e2e-4f34-a973-f58cd25eed0d
ORCID for Elizabeth Miles: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8643-0655
ORCID for Philip Calder: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6038-710X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Sep 2020 16:30
Last modified: 22 Nov 2021 08:14

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Contributors

Author: Ella Baker
Author: Carina Alejandra Valenzuela
Author: Wies van Dooremalen
Author: Leyre Martínez-Fernández
Author: Parveen Yaqoob
Author: Elizabeth Miles ORCID iD
Author: Philip Calder ORCID iD

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