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Molecular epidemiology and clinical impact of rhinovirus infections in adults during three epidemic seasons in 11 European countries (2007–2010)

Molecular epidemiology and clinical impact of rhinovirus infections in adults during three epidemic seasons in 11 European countries (2007–2010)
Molecular epidemiology and clinical impact of rhinovirus infections in adults during three epidemic seasons in 11 European countries (2007–2010)

Background Differences in clinical impact between rhinovirus (RVs) species and types in adults are not well established. The objective of this study was to determine the epidemiology and clinical impact of the different RV species.

Methods We conducted a prospective study of RVs infections in adults with acute cough/lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) and asymptomatic controls. Subjects were recruited from 16 primary care networks located in 11 European countries between 2007 and 2010. RV detection and genotyping was performed by means of real time and conventional reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays, followed by sequence analysis. Clinical data were obtained from medical records and patient symptom diaries.

Results RVs were detected in 566 (19%) of 3016 symptomatic adults, 102 (4%) of their 2539 follow-up samples and 67 (4%) of 1677 asymptomatic controls. Genotyping was successful for 538 (95%) symptomatic subjects, 86 (84%) follow-up infections and 62 (93%) controls. RV-A was the prevailing species, associated with an increased risk of LRTI as compared with RV-B (relative risk (RR), 4.5; 95% CI 2.5 to 7.9; p<0.001) and RV-C (RR 2.2; 95% CI 1.2 to 3.9; p=0.010). In symptomatic subjects, RV-A loads were higher than those of RV-B (p=0.015). Symptom scores and duration were similar across species. More RV-A infected patients felt generally unwell in comparison to RV-C (p=0·023). Of the 140 RV types identified, five were new types; asymptomatic infections were associated with multiple types.

Interpretation In adults, RV-A is significantly more often detected in cases with acute cough/LRTI than RV-C, while RV-B infection is often found in asymptomatic patients.

respiratory Infection, viral infection
0040-6376
882-890
Zlateva, Kalina
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van Rijn, Anneloes L.
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Simmonds, Peter
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Coenjaerts, Frank E.J.
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van Loon, Anton M.
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Verheij, Theo J.M.
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de Vries, Jutte J.C.
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Little, Paul
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Butler, Christopher C.
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van Zwet, Erik W.
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Goossens, Herman
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Ieven, Margareta
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Claas, Eric C.J.
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the GRACE Study Group
Zlateva, Kalina
a9be32f2-fa97-44f0-b40b-c5d56450c560
van Rijn, Anneloes L.
62f57ccb-b4f0-47fd-8fc9-dd474ad7000e
Simmonds, Peter
27d4c068-e352-4cbf-9899-771893788ade
Coenjaerts, Frank E.J.
85fd8d79-a1c8-4eec-baff-158f81eeb8a5
van Loon, Anton M.
1f50866b-ae14-480b-b86d-7cfc93bfd291
Verheij, Theo J.M.
0164f6e4-2c95-4233-8c2e-29b616c8ff66
de Vries, Jutte J.C.
89b2a475-dcc3-47ef-ab93-d4e3760123a0
Little, Paul
1bf2d1f7-200c-47a5-ab16-fe5a8756a777
Butler, Christopher C.
c8cc70b1-5fb9-4b03-bb80-11c6aabb7e6f
van Zwet, Erik W.
e7debd6f-382a-475b-bd58-0f3b05e606d1
Goossens, Herman
31f8e1ae-7da0-473c-bd49-f911c2187451
Ieven, Margareta
c138048d-d838-4c8e-848d-a43e309f4cf0
Claas, Eric C.J.
ac1a6cfa-813e-4304-9bf8-082a4d85eec5

Zlateva, Kalina, van Rijn, Anneloes L., Simmonds, Peter, Coenjaerts, Frank E.J., van Loon, Anton M., Verheij, Theo J.M., de Vries, Jutte J.C., Little, Paul, Butler, Christopher C., van Zwet, Erik W., Goossens, Herman, Ieven, Margareta and Claas, Eric C.J. , the GRACE Study Group (2020) Molecular epidemiology and clinical impact of rhinovirus infections in adults during three epidemic seasons in 11 European countries (2007–2010). Thorax, 75 (10), 882-890. (doi:10.1136/thoraxjnl-2019-214317).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background Differences in clinical impact between rhinovirus (RVs) species and types in adults are not well established. The objective of this study was to determine the epidemiology and clinical impact of the different RV species.

Methods We conducted a prospective study of RVs infections in adults with acute cough/lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) and asymptomatic controls. Subjects were recruited from 16 primary care networks located in 11 European countries between 2007 and 2010. RV detection and genotyping was performed by means of real time and conventional reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays, followed by sequence analysis. Clinical data were obtained from medical records and patient symptom diaries.

Results RVs were detected in 566 (19%) of 3016 symptomatic adults, 102 (4%) of their 2539 follow-up samples and 67 (4%) of 1677 asymptomatic controls. Genotyping was successful for 538 (95%) symptomatic subjects, 86 (84%) follow-up infections and 62 (93%) controls. RV-A was the prevailing species, associated with an increased risk of LRTI as compared with RV-B (relative risk (RR), 4.5; 95% CI 2.5 to 7.9; p<0.001) and RV-C (RR 2.2; 95% CI 1.2 to 3.9; p=0.010). In symptomatic subjects, RV-A loads were higher than those of RV-B (p=0.015). Symptom scores and duration were similar across species. More RV-A infected patients felt generally unwell in comparison to RV-C (p=0·023). Of the 140 RV types identified, five were new types; asymptomatic infections were associated with multiple types.

Interpretation In adults, RV-A is significantly more often detected in cases with acute cough/LRTI than RV-C, while RV-B infection is often found in asymptomatic patients.

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Accepted/In Press date: 18 June 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 20 August 2020
Keywords: respiratory Infection, viral infection

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 443780
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/443780
ISSN: 0040-6376
PURE UUID: 057a77ad-15e9-422d-85da-2c713f911fbf

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Date deposited: 11 Sep 2020 16:41
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 10:24

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Contributors

Author: Kalina Zlateva
Author: Anneloes L. van Rijn
Author: Peter Simmonds
Author: Frank E.J. Coenjaerts
Author: Anton M. van Loon
Author: Theo J.M. Verheij
Author: Jutte J.C. de Vries
Author: Paul Little
Author: Christopher C. Butler
Author: Erik W. van Zwet
Author: Herman Goossens
Author: Margareta Ieven
Author: Eric C.J. Claas
Corporate Author: the GRACE Study Group

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