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Fetal programming and epigenetics

Fetal programming and epigenetics
Fetal programming and epigenetics
Accumulating evidence suggests that the intrauterine environment can have an impact on long-term offspring health, so-called ‘fetal programming’. A number of environmental stressors have been studied in humans including maternal nutrition, smoking, substance misuse and mental illness. Although various biological mechanisms are likely to underpin fetal programming effects, there has been a particular focus on epigenetic modifications as potential mediators of observed associations between early environmental exposures and later health outcomes. In this review, we give an overview of evidence supporting a role for epigenetics in fetal programming, highlighting key human and animal studies. We also discuss challenges for research in this area, along with recommendations for future work, and potential therapeutic applications.
DNA methylation, Epigenetics, Fetal programming
2451-9650
1-6
Stevenson, Kerrie
45bcb358-018e-415a-90ba-15d6d818ec47
Lillycrop, Karen A.
eeaaa78d-0c4d-4033-a178-60ce7345a2cc
Silver, Matt J.
b80ecb7f-b011-4f37-9b9a-d0c63f1979c4
Stevenson, Kerrie
45bcb358-018e-415a-90ba-15d6d818ec47
Lillycrop, Karen A.
eeaaa78d-0c4d-4033-a178-60ce7345a2cc
Silver, Matt J.
b80ecb7f-b011-4f37-9b9a-d0c63f1979c4

Stevenson, Kerrie, Lillycrop, Karen A. and Silver, Matt J. (2020) Fetal programming and epigenetics. Current Opinion in Endocrine and Metabolic Research, 13, 1-6. (doi:10.1016/j.coemr.2020.07.005).

Record type: Review

Abstract

Accumulating evidence suggests that the intrauterine environment can have an impact on long-term offspring health, so-called ‘fetal programming’. A number of environmental stressors have been studied in humans including maternal nutrition, smoking, substance misuse and mental illness. Although various biological mechanisms are likely to underpin fetal programming effects, there has been a particular focus on epigenetic modifications as potential mediators of observed associations between early environmental exposures and later health outcomes. In this review, we give an overview of evidence supporting a role for epigenetics in fetal programming, highlighting key human and animal studies. We also discuss challenges for research in this area, along with recommendations for future work, and potential therapeutic applications.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 25 July 2020
Published date: 1 August 2020
Keywords: DNA methylation, Epigenetics, Fetal programming

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 443826
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/443826
ISSN: 2451-9650
PURE UUID: bdf0adb7-dcb3-4353-aecb-4cb1decfec7f
ORCID for Karen A. Lillycrop: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7350-5489

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Sep 2020 16:31
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:38

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Contributors

Author: Kerrie Stevenson
Author: Matt J. Silver

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