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Task coordination in multiagent systems

Task coordination in multiagent systems
Task coordination in multiagent systems
We present an overview of the Task Coordination (TC) problem in multiagent systems and discuss the specific elements that are required to develop a solution to this problem. Task coordination refers to a twofold problem where an exogenously imposed state of affairs should be satisfied by a multiagent system (MAS): (1) the agents need to be assigned tasks to fulfill the given state of affairs (task allocation) and (2) the behavior of agents needs to be monitored to evaluate whether their tasks are fulfilled so that responsibility for dismissed tasks can be determined (task responsibility). This becomes especially challenging when agents are autonomous and may have imperfect information about their environment. Then, the allocation of tasks and responsibilities should regard agents' strategic ability under imperfect information. To date, existing work on the application of strategic reasoning for task allocation assumes perfect information for agents (dismissing imperfect information settings) and allocates tasks to individual agents (dismissing the potential for allocating tasks to agent groups). This calls for TC frameworks able to model task allocation in imperfect information settings and by allowing the allocation of tasks to agent groups. Such a framework should also be able to determine the responsibility of agents for dismissed tasks via a task responsibility mechanism that complements the task allocation procedure. This work discusses various aspects of the TC problem, sets forward a conceptual analysis on expected properties of potential solution concepts, and presents the overview of a suggested approach for developing a TC framework using techniques from formal strategic reasoning.
Responsibility Reasoning, Task Allocation, Applied Formal Methods, Strategic Reasoning, Task Coordination, Multiagent Systems
2056-2058
Yazdanpanah, Vahid
28f82058-5e51-4f56-be14-191ab5767d56
Dastani, Mehdi
44cecb91-95c6-4821-a307-c43e9434ea4a
Fatima, Shaheen
34eb181a-62b1-4824-8284-f37cd875064f
Jennings, Nicholas R.
ab3d94cc-247c-4545-9d1e-65873d6cdb30
Yazan, Devrim Murat
84983095-8f6e-4dbe-baeb-c9cb6d4b2e84
Zijm, W. Henk M.
11a3616e-7e77-461d-aa43-aa0bcba337a3
Yazdanpanah, Vahid
28f82058-5e51-4f56-be14-191ab5767d56
Dastani, Mehdi
44cecb91-95c6-4821-a307-c43e9434ea4a
Fatima, Shaheen
34eb181a-62b1-4824-8284-f37cd875064f
Jennings, Nicholas R.
ab3d94cc-247c-4545-9d1e-65873d6cdb30
Yazan, Devrim Murat
84983095-8f6e-4dbe-baeb-c9cb6d4b2e84
Zijm, W. Henk M.
11a3616e-7e77-461d-aa43-aa0bcba337a3

Yazdanpanah, Vahid, Dastani, Mehdi, Fatima, Shaheen, Jennings, Nicholas R., Yazan, Devrim Murat and Zijm, W. Henk M. (2020) Task coordination in multiagent systems. Nineteenth International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems, Auckland, New Zealand, New Zealand. 09 - 13 May 2020. pp. 2056-2058 . (doi:10.5555/3398761.3399073).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

We present an overview of the Task Coordination (TC) problem in multiagent systems and discuss the specific elements that are required to develop a solution to this problem. Task coordination refers to a twofold problem where an exogenously imposed state of affairs should be satisfied by a multiagent system (MAS): (1) the agents need to be assigned tasks to fulfill the given state of affairs (task allocation) and (2) the behavior of agents needs to be monitored to evaluate whether their tasks are fulfilled so that responsibility for dismissed tasks can be determined (task responsibility). This becomes especially challenging when agents are autonomous and may have imperfect information about their environment. Then, the allocation of tasks and responsibilities should regard agents' strategic ability under imperfect information. To date, existing work on the application of strategic reasoning for task allocation assumes perfect information for agents (dismissing imperfect information settings) and allocates tasks to individual agents (dismissing the potential for allocating tasks to agent groups). This calls for TC frameworks able to model task allocation in imperfect information settings and by allowing the allocation of tasks to agent groups. Such a framework should also be able to determine the responsibility of agents for dismissed tasks via a task responsibility mechanism that complements the task allocation procedure. This work discusses various aspects of the TC problem, sets forward a conceptual analysis on expected properties of potential solution concepts, and presents the overview of a suggested approach for developing a TC framework using techniques from formal strategic reasoning.

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More information

Published date: 2020
Venue - Dates: Nineteenth International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems, Auckland, New Zealand, New Zealand, 2020-05-09 - 2020-05-13
Keywords: Responsibility Reasoning, Task Allocation, Applied Formal Methods, Strategic Reasoning, Task Coordination, Multiagent Systems

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 443934
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/443934
PURE UUID: 67a50eb9-7337-43dc-8c41-09127555906e
ORCID for Vahid Yazdanpanah: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4468-6193

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Date deposited: 17 Sep 2020 16:30
Last modified: 18 Sep 2020 01:53

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Contributors

Author: Vahid Yazdanpanah ORCID iD
Author: Mehdi Dastani
Author: Shaheen Fatima
Author: Nicholas R. Jennings
Author: Devrim Murat Yazan
Author: W. Henk M. Zijm

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