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Gridded population survey sampling: a systematic scoping review of the field and strategic research agenda

Gridded population survey sampling: a systematic scoping review of the field and strategic research agenda
Gridded population survey sampling: a systematic scoping review of the field and strategic research agenda
Introduction
In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), household survey data are a main source of information for planning, evaluation, and decision-making. Standard surveys are based on censuses, however, for many LMICs it has been more than 10 years since their last census and they face high urban growth rates. Over the last decade, survey designers have begun to use modelled gridded population estimates as sample frames. We summarize the state of the emerging field of gridded population survey sampling, focussing on LMICs.

Methods
We performed a systematic scoping review in Scopus of specific gridded population datasets and "population" or "household" "survey" reports, and solicited additional published and unpublished sources from colleagues.

Results
We identified 43 national and sub-national gridded population-based household surveys implemented across 29 LMICs. Gridded population surveys used automated and manual approaches to derive clusters from WorldPop and LandScan gridded population estimates. After sampling, some survey teams interviewed all households in each cluster or segment, and others sampled households from larger clusters. Tools to select gridded population survey clusters include the GridSample R package, Geo-sampling tool, and GridSample.org. In the field, gridded population surveys generally relied on geographically accurate maps based on satellite imagery or OpenStreetMap, and a tablet or GPS technology for navigation.

Conclusions
For gridded population survey sampling to be adopted more widely, several strategic questions need answering regarding cell-level accuracy and uncertainty of gridded population estimates, the methods used to group/split cells into sample frame units, design effects of new sample designs, and feasibility of tools and methods to implement surveys across diverse settings.
1476-072X
1-16
Thomson-Browne, Dana Renee
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Rhoda, Dale A.
8d3b4461-4dda-4036-83d0-13666633495d
Tatem, Andrew
6c6de104-a5f9-46e0-bb93-a1a7c980513e
Castro, Marcia C.
66b7cfe2-746c-4660-a99a-3ec6628b2d07
Thomson-Browne, Dana Renee
c6aa22a0-9ee2-4d86-9bd4-b3a8487eb15b
Rhoda, Dale A.
8d3b4461-4dda-4036-83d0-13666633495d
Tatem, Andrew
6c6de104-a5f9-46e0-bb93-a1a7c980513e
Castro, Marcia C.
66b7cfe2-746c-4660-a99a-3ec6628b2d07

Thomson-Browne, Dana Renee, Rhoda, Dale A., Tatem, Andrew and Castro, Marcia C. (2020) Gridded population survey sampling: a systematic scoping review of the field and strategic research agenda. International Journal of Health Geographics, 19 (34 (2020)), 1-16, [34]. (doi:10.1186/s12942-020-00230-4).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Introduction
In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), household survey data are a main source of information for planning, evaluation, and decision-making. Standard surveys are based on censuses, however, for many LMICs it has been more than 10 years since their last census and they face high urban growth rates. Over the last decade, survey designers have begun to use modelled gridded population estimates as sample frames. We summarize the state of the emerging field of gridded population survey sampling, focussing on LMICs.

Methods
We performed a systematic scoping review in Scopus of specific gridded population datasets and "population" or "household" "survey" reports, and solicited additional published and unpublished sources from colleagues.

Results
We identified 43 national and sub-national gridded population-based household surveys implemented across 29 LMICs. Gridded population surveys used automated and manual approaches to derive clusters from WorldPop and LandScan gridded population estimates. After sampling, some survey teams interviewed all households in each cluster or segment, and others sampled households from larger clusters. Tools to select gridded population survey clusters include the GridSample R package, Geo-sampling tool, and GridSample.org. In the field, gridded population surveys generally relied on geographically accurate maps based on satellite imagery or OpenStreetMap, and a tablet or GPS technology for navigation.

Conclusions
For gridded population survey sampling to be adopted more widely, several strategic questions need answering regarding cell-level accuracy and uncertainty of gridded population estimates, the methods used to group/split cells into sample frame units, design effects of new sample designs, and feasibility of tools and methods to implement surveys across diverse settings.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 4 September 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 9 September 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 443951
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/443951
ISSN: 1476-072X
PURE UUID: aab53f73-f925-412c-a938-d978ac75a036
ORCID for Dana Renee Thomson-Browne: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9507-9123
ORCID for Andrew Tatem: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7270-941X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Sep 2020 16:41
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 02:14

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