The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Household-reported availability of drinking water in Africa: A systematic review

Household-reported availability of drinking water in Africa: A systematic review
Household-reported availability of drinking water in Africa: A systematic review
Domestic drinking water supplies prone to interruptions and low per capita domestic water availability have been frequently reported among African households. Despite expanded international monitoring indicators that now include metrics of water availability, the range of methods used for measuring and monitoring availability remains unclear in Africa. Few household surveys have historically assessed water continuity and per capita availability, and both pose measurement challenges. This paper aims to examine the methods used to measure availability and synthesise evidence on African domestic water availability by systematically reviewing the literature from 2000–2019. Structured searches were conducted in five databases: Web of Science Core Collection, Scopus, GEOBASE, Compendex and PubMed/Medline. A total of 47 of 2406 reports met all inclusion criteria. Included studies were based on empirical research which reported the household’s perspective on a water availability measure. Most studies had methodological problems such as small sample sizes, non-representative sampling and incomplete reporting of methods and measures of uncertainty. Measurement of drinking water availability is primarily reliant on quantifying litres/capita/day (LPCD). Only four (9%) of the included studies reported an average water availability over the international benchmark of 50 LPCD. This pattern of water insufficiency is broadly consistent with previous studies of domestic water availability in Africa. The review highlights the need for high-quality and representative studies to better understand the uncertainties and differences in household water availability across Africa, and the methods used to measure it.
African Union, availability, continuity, drinking water, intermittency, litres per capita per day, sufficiency, water supply
2073-4441
1-28
Thomas, Mair
c43a2135-6dbc-4fc4-9c69-cd9ece0623b1
Channon, Andrew Amos
5a60607c-6861-4960-a81d-504169d5880c
Bain, Robert
fbe0c708-ec60-4ea8-a34a-1167174add8b
Nyamai, Mutono
c88301b3-e962-4e60-9d22-41e560d2de79
Wright, Jim A.
94990ecf-f8dd-4649-84f2-b28bf272e464
Thomas, Mair
c43a2135-6dbc-4fc4-9c69-cd9ece0623b1
Channon, Andrew Amos
5a60607c-6861-4960-a81d-504169d5880c
Bain, Robert
fbe0c708-ec60-4ea8-a34a-1167174add8b
Nyamai, Mutono
c88301b3-e962-4e60-9d22-41e560d2de79
Wright, Jim A.
94990ecf-f8dd-4649-84f2-b28bf272e464

Thomas, Mair, Channon, Andrew Amos, Bain, Robert, Nyamai, Mutono and Wright, Jim A. (2020) Household-reported availability of drinking water in Africa: A systematic review. Water, 12 (9), 1-28, [2603]. (doi:10.3390/w12092603).

Record type: Review

Abstract

Domestic drinking water supplies prone to interruptions and low per capita domestic water availability have been frequently reported among African households. Despite expanded international monitoring indicators that now include metrics of water availability, the range of methods used for measuring and monitoring availability remains unclear in Africa. Few household surveys have historically assessed water continuity and per capita availability, and both pose measurement challenges. This paper aims to examine the methods used to measure availability and synthesise evidence on African domestic water availability by systematically reviewing the literature from 2000–2019. Structured searches were conducted in five databases: Web of Science Core Collection, Scopus, GEOBASE, Compendex and PubMed/Medline. A total of 47 of 2406 reports met all inclusion criteria. Included studies were based on empirical research which reported the household’s perspective on a water availability measure. Most studies had methodological problems such as small sample sizes, non-representative sampling and incomplete reporting of methods and measures of uncertainty. Measurement of drinking water availability is primarily reliant on quantifying litres/capita/day (LPCD). Only four (9%) of the included studies reported an average water availability over the international benchmark of 50 LPCD. This pattern of water insufficiency is broadly consistent with previous studies of domestic water availability in Africa. The review highlights the need for high-quality and representative studies to better understand the uncertainties and differences in household water availability across Africa, and the methods used to measure it.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 10 September 2020
Published date: 17 September 2020
Keywords: African Union, availability, continuity, drinking water, intermittency, litres per capita per day, sufficiency, water supply

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 444103
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/444103
ISSN: 2073-4441
PURE UUID: 5945845c-44cd-4a13-8360-1f1849798d50
ORCID for Mair Thomas: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1899-2434
ORCID for Andrew Amos Channon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4855-0418
ORCID for Jim A. Wright: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8842-2181

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Sep 2020 16:31
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 03:17

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Mair Thomas ORCID iD
Author: Robert Bain
Author: Mutono Nyamai
Author: Jim A. Wright ORCID iD

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×