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A creative destruction approach to replication: Implicit work and sex morality across cultures

A creative destruction approach to replication: Implicit work and sex morality across cultures
A creative destruction approach to replication: Implicit work and sex morality across cultures
How can we maximize what is learned from a replication study? In the creative destruction approach to replication, the original hypothesis is compared not only to the null hypothesis, but also to predictions derived from multiple alternative theoretical accounts of the phenomenon. To this end, new populations and measures are included in the design in addition to the original ones, to help determine which theory best accounts for the results across multiple key outcomes and contexts. The present pre-registered empirical project compared the Implicit Puritanism account of intuitive work and sex morality to theories positing regional, religious, and social class differences; explicit rather than implicit cultural differences in values; self-expression vs. survival values as a key cultural fault line; the general moralization of work; and false positive effects. Contradicting Implicit Puritanism’s core theoretical claim of a distinct American work morality, a number of targeted findings replicated across multiple comparison cultures, whereas several failed to replicate in all samples and were identified as likely false positives. No support emerged for theories predicting regional variability and specific individual-differences
moderators (religious affiliation, religiosity, and education level). Overall, the results provide evidence that work is intuitively moralized across cultures.
Replication, theory testing, falsification, implicit social cognition, priming, work values, culture
0022-1031
Tierney, Warren
3f695765-bffe-40a2-8bca-8e1b3604f058
Hardy III, Jay
460f5151-50fb-4fa4-b699-88b939007b12
Ebersole, Charles
b3c01105-5d90-4744-a918-618ede4dee0f
Viganola, Domenico
c4234bcc-1441-4636-8c44-da694edbccb7
Clemente, Elena
40fbb058-ca61-4ca1-840a-13456f3cf624
Gordon, Michael
84cc2c50-7c7b-4ae1-816c-4ba071d10145
Uhlmann, Eric
59e77fb5-554d-4e4a-a1f2-e6a99be94a79
Dawson, Ian
dff1b440-6c83-4354-92b6-04809460b01a
et al.
Tierney, Warren
3f695765-bffe-40a2-8bca-8e1b3604f058
Hardy III, Jay
460f5151-50fb-4fa4-b699-88b939007b12
Ebersole, Charles
b3c01105-5d90-4744-a918-618ede4dee0f
Viganola, Domenico
c4234bcc-1441-4636-8c44-da694edbccb7
Clemente, Elena
40fbb058-ca61-4ca1-840a-13456f3cf624
Gordon, Michael
84cc2c50-7c7b-4ae1-816c-4ba071d10145
Uhlmann, Eric
59e77fb5-554d-4e4a-a1f2-e6a99be94a79
Dawson, Ian
dff1b440-6c83-4354-92b6-04809460b01a

Tierney, Warren, Hardy III, Jay and Ebersole, Charles , et al. (2020) A creative destruction approach to replication: Implicit work and sex morality across cultures. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

How can we maximize what is learned from a replication study? In the creative destruction approach to replication, the original hypothesis is compared not only to the null hypothesis, but also to predictions derived from multiple alternative theoretical accounts of the phenomenon. To this end, new populations and measures are included in the design in addition to the original ones, to help determine which theory best accounts for the results across multiple key outcomes and contexts. The present pre-registered empirical project compared the Implicit Puritanism account of intuitive work and sex morality to theories positing regional, religious, and social class differences; explicit rather than implicit cultural differences in values; self-expression vs. survival values as a key cultural fault line; the general moralization of work; and false positive effects. Contradicting Implicit Puritanism’s core theoretical claim of a distinct American work morality, a number of targeted findings replicated across multiple comparison cultures, whereas several failed to replicate in all samples and were identified as likely false positives. No support emerged for theories predicting regional variability and specific individual-differences
moderators (religious affiliation, religiosity, and education level). Overall, the results provide evidence that work is intuitively moralized across cultures.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 15 September 2020
Keywords: Replication, theory testing, falsification, implicit social cognition, priming, work values, culture

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 444105
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/444105
ISSN: 0022-1031
PURE UUID: 6cec78f2-633f-427a-9e72-5e8b5eca0943
ORCID for Ian Dawson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0555-9682

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Sep 2020 16:33
Last modified: 11 Mar 2022 02:45

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Contributors

Author: Warren Tierney
Author: Jay Hardy III
Author: Charles Ebersole
Author: Domenico Viganola
Author: Elena Clemente
Author: Michael Gordon
Author: Eric Uhlmann
Author: Ian Dawson ORCID iD
Corporate Author: et al.

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