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Gender attitudes and practices among married and cohabiting parents

Gender attitudes and practices among married and cohabiting parents
Gender attitudes and practices among married and cohabiting parents
The number of couples who live together but are not married (cohabiting) has surged in the UK, and a new family type has been created: cohabiting couples with children. It is important to understand the differences between married and cohabiting families to form effective social policy. Knowing gender attitudes and practices helps understand gender inequality and social economic conditions among cohabiting and married parents. We might expect that cohabiting couples are more modern in their attitudes compared with their married counterparts. Cohabiting women may be more likely to be in paid work and cohabiting men may be more likely to share housework duties. We might also expect that women in cohabiting partnerships are less willing to specialise in domestic work; cohabitors in the UK have fewer legal protections, especially upon separation, so specialisation in unpaid work at home might be seen as more risky for cohabiting women. In this briefing, we summarise our findings on the gender roles of cohabiting and married parents.
ESRC Centre for Population Change
Chao, Shih-Yi
66a5d917-544a-46ea-85d7-7a2d303d4469
Berrington, Ann
bd0fc093-310d-4236-8126-ca0c7eb9ddde
Perelli-Harris, Brienna
9d3d6b25-d710-480b-8677-534d58ebe9ed
Chao, Shih-Yi
66a5d917-544a-46ea-85d7-7a2d303d4469
Berrington, Ann
bd0fc093-310d-4236-8126-ca0c7eb9ddde
Perelli-Harris, Brienna
9d3d6b25-d710-480b-8677-534d58ebe9ed

Chao, Shih-Yi, Berrington, Ann and Perelli-Harris, Brienna (2020) Gender attitudes and practices among married and cohabiting parents (Centre for Policy Change Policy Briefings, 57) University of Southampton. ESRC Centre for Population Change 4pp.

Record type: Monograph (Project Report)

Abstract

The number of couples who live together but are not married (cohabiting) has surged in the UK, and a new family type has been created: cohabiting couples with children. It is important to understand the differences between married and cohabiting families to form effective social policy. Knowing gender attitudes and practices helps understand gender inequality and social economic conditions among cohabiting and married parents. We might expect that cohabiting couples are more modern in their attitudes compared with their married counterparts. Cohabiting women may be more likely to be in paid work and cohabiting men may be more likely to share housework duties. We might also expect that women in cohabiting partnerships are less willing to specialise in domestic work; cohabitors in the UK have fewer legal protections, especially upon separation, so specialisation in unpaid work at home might be seen as more risky for cohabiting women. In this briefing, we summarise our findings on the gender roles of cohabiting and married parents.

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More information

Published date: 17 September 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 444149
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/444149
PURE UUID: aa9f1168-0a34-4cef-9540-555c6f1c633d
ORCID for Shih-Yi Chao: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4406-0665
ORCID for Ann Berrington: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1683-6668
ORCID for Brienna Perelli-Harris: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8234-4007

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Sep 2020 17:33
Last modified: 13 Dec 2021 03:35

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Contributors

Author: Shih-Yi Chao ORCID iD
Author: Ann Berrington ORCID iD

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