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Numerical modelling of transient cyclic vertical loading of suction caissons in sand

Numerical modelling of transient cyclic vertical loading of suction caissons in sand
Numerical modelling of transient cyclic vertical loading of suction caissons in sand
This paper presents numerical investigations of the monotonic and cyclic behaviours of suction caissons upon vertical transient loading. Both drained and partially drained conditions are investigated. Monotonic compression and traction simulations are carried out to qualitatively compare results with the literature and validate the model. They highlight the different modes of reaction of the caisson to both compression and traction loading. A sensitivity analysis points out the strong influence of some parameters on the resistance of the caisson but also on the failure mechanism. The transient behaviour of the caisson upon different kinds of cyclic load signals is analysed. Results reproduce the settlement and pore water pressure accumulations observed during experiments. The influence of the key design parameters on the settlement accumulation is also assessed. Finally a cyclic diagram is proposed to describe the evolution of the final settlement upon different magnitudes of loading.
finite-element modelling, offshore engineering, repeated loading, sands, soil/structure interaction
0016-8505
121-136
Cerfontaine, Benjamin
0730daf4-9d6b-4f2d-a848-a3fc54505a02
Collin, Frédéric
27fa6a2d-f8e2-473f-a3b2-070eca6a9c3a
Charlier, Robert
3bba8221-b05d-431a-8a41-40f1b5dcc7e8
Cerfontaine, Benjamin
0730daf4-9d6b-4f2d-a848-a3fc54505a02
Collin, Frédéric
27fa6a2d-f8e2-473f-a3b2-070eca6a9c3a
Charlier, Robert
3bba8221-b05d-431a-8a41-40f1b5dcc7e8

Cerfontaine, Benjamin, Collin, Frédéric and Charlier, Robert (2016) Numerical modelling of transient cyclic vertical loading of suction caissons in sand. Geotechnique, 65 (12), 121-136. (doi:10.1680/jgeot.15.P.061).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper presents numerical investigations of the monotonic and cyclic behaviours of suction caissons upon vertical transient loading. Both drained and partially drained conditions are investigated. Monotonic compression and traction simulations are carried out to qualitatively compare results with the literature and validate the model. They highlight the different modes of reaction of the caisson to both compression and traction loading. A sensitivity analysis points out the strong influence of some parameters on the resistance of the caisson but also on the failure mechanism. The transient behaviour of the caisson upon different kinds of cyclic load signals is analysed. Results reproduce the settlement and pore water pressure accumulations observed during experiments. The influence of the key design parameters on the settlement accumulation is also assessed. Finally a cyclic diagram is proposed to describe the evolution of the final settlement upon different magnitudes of loading.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 21 January 2016
Published date: February 2016
Keywords: finite-element modelling, offshore engineering, repeated loading, sands, soil/structure interaction

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 444204
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/444204
ISSN: 0016-8505
PURE UUID: 8b319ff8-2ce3-4aa0-9aeb-3a01339dddb5
ORCID for Benjamin Cerfontaine: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4833-9412

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Oct 2020 16:34
Last modified: 02 Oct 2020 01:53

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Contributors

Author: Frédéric Collin
Author: Robert Charlier

University divisions

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