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The role of adrenal morphology in high fat diet-induced anxiety in mature adult mice

The role of adrenal morphology in high fat diet-induced anxiety in mature adult mice
The role of adrenal morphology in high fat diet-induced anxiety in mature adult mice
Background/Aims: We have shown effects of both maternal and postweaning HF diet-induced obesity to increase anxiety and corticosterone output in mature adult mice, suggesting changes in the regulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. The current study investigated glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid (MR) receptors in key brain regions of these mice, as well as FKBP51, a negative modulator of these receptors that is associated with anxiety-related disorders. Method: Female C57BL/6 mice were fed either HF (HF: 45% kcal fat) or control diet (C: 7% kcal fat) 6 weeks before mating and throughout pregnancy and lactation. Male and female offspring were fed C or HF diet from weaning (3 weeks) (CC: n=7-8; CHF: n=4-7; HFC: n=7-9; HFHF: n=6-8/sex). In 52-week offspring brain (hippocampus [CA3] and hypothalamus [PVN]), GR, MR and FKBP51 mRNA levels were measured (RT-PCR). Data were analysed by mixed effects model (SPSS). Results: In 52 week males, maternal HF diet reduced MR (P<0.001) and increased FKBP51 (P<0.01) in CA3. Postweaning HF diet also increased FKBP51 (P<001) in CA3 in males. In females, postweaning HF diet reduced MR (P<0.01) in CA3 but increased MR (P<0.05) and FKBP51 (P<0.001) in PVN. GR was unaffected in either sex by maternal or postweaning HF diet in PVN or CA3. Conclusions: Changes in key factors in feedback mechanisms of the HPA axis in the mature adult brain suggest that maternal and postweaning HF diets may have long-term effects on stress responsiveness in a sex-specific manner. The increase in FKBP51 in both males and females following postweaning HF diet could be linked to the increased basal corticosterone we have previously observed in these animals, contributing to their heightened anxiety.
Poore, Kirsten
b9529ba3-6432-4935-b8fd-6e382f11f0ad
Green, Lucy
8a601974-efe5-4916-9268-9e7bc72d89c5
Cagampang, Felino
7cf57d52-4a65-4554-8306-ed65226bc50e
Teeling, Jessica
fcde1c8e-e5f8-4747-9f3a-6bdb5cd87d0a
Rasool, Aisha
81810860-ff3f-493d-b85e-5de4ca1be8f3
Ogawa, N.O.
d3b513b5-da9b-4522-a0a6-c324fbd8af2b
Poore, Kirsten
b9529ba3-6432-4935-b8fd-6e382f11f0ad
Green, Lucy
8a601974-efe5-4916-9268-9e7bc72d89c5
Cagampang, Felino
7cf57d52-4a65-4554-8306-ed65226bc50e
Teeling, Jessica
fcde1c8e-e5f8-4747-9f3a-6bdb5cd87d0a
Rasool, Aisha
81810860-ff3f-493d-b85e-5de4ca1be8f3
Ogawa, N.O.
d3b513b5-da9b-4522-a0a6-c324fbd8af2b

Poore, Kirsten, Green, Lucy, Cagampang, Felino, Teeling, Jessica, Rasool, Aisha and Ogawa, N.O. (2019) The role of adrenal morphology in high fat diet-induced anxiety in mature adult mice. XIth World DOHaD Congress, , Melbourne, Australia. 22 - 26 Oct 2019.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

Background/Aims: We have shown effects of both maternal and postweaning HF diet-induced obesity to increase anxiety and corticosterone output in mature adult mice, suggesting changes in the regulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. The current study investigated glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid (MR) receptors in key brain regions of these mice, as well as FKBP51, a negative modulator of these receptors that is associated with anxiety-related disorders. Method: Female C57BL/6 mice were fed either HF (HF: 45% kcal fat) or control diet (C: 7% kcal fat) 6 weeks before mating and throughout pregnancy and lactation. Male and female offspring were fed C or HF diet from weaning (3 weeks) (CC: n=7-8; CHF: n=4-7; HFC: n=7-9; HFHF: n=6-8/sex). In 52-week offspring brain (hippocampus [CA3] and hypothalamus [PVN]), GR, MR and FKBP51 mRNA levels were measured (RT-PCR). Data were analysed by mixed effects model (SPSS). Results: In 52 week males, maternal HF diet reduced MR (P<0.001) and increased FKBP51 (P<0.01) in CA3. Postweaning HF diet also increased FKBP51 (P<001) in CA3 in males. In females, postweaning HF diet reduced MR (P<0.01) in CA3 but increased MR (P<0.05) and FKBP51 (P<0.001) in PVN. GR was unaffected in either sex by maternal or postweaning HF diet in PVN or CA3. Conclusions: Changes in key factors in feedback mechanisms of the HPA axis in the mature adult brain suggest that maternal and postweaning HF diets may have long-term effects on stress responsiveness in a sex-specific manner. The increase in FKBP51 in both males and females following postweaning HF diet could be linked to the increased basal corticosterone we have previously observed in these animals, contributing to their heightened anxiety.

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More information

Published date: October 2019
Venue - Dates: XIth World DOHaD Congress, , Melbourne, Australia, 2019-10-22 - 2019-10-26

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 444322
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/444322
PURE UUID: c992d94b-1d39-431d-8495-3944662cae6a
ORCID for Kirsten Poore: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1455-0615
ORCID for Lucy Green: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7423-9696
ORCID for Felino Cagampang: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4404-9853
ORCID for Jessica Teeling: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4004-7391

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 Oct 2020 16:35
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:03

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Contributors

Author: Kirsten Poore ORCID iD
Author: Lucy Green ORCID iD
Author: Jessica Teeling ORCID iD
Author: Aisha Rasool
Author: N.O. Ogawa

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