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Brilliant opportunities across the spectrum

Brilliant opportunities across the spectrum
Brilliant opportunities across the spectrum
Third generation synchrotron light sources provide stable, tuneable light of energy up to the hard X-ray region. The gain of a trillion in brightness as compared to a conventional laboratory X-ray source transforms the opportunities for establishing structure-function relationships. The light may be quasi-continuous or pulsed, have controllable polarisation and have coherence lengths larger than the sample size. The high brightness provides a basis for adding time and spatial resolution to X-ray scattering and spectroscopy. It may also be used to identify very specific information about the magnetic properties of atoms within materials, element specific vibrations, and local structural descriptions identified with chemical speciation. More demanding scattering and diffraction problems can be solved such as weakly scattering materials, large unit cells and structural entities. The high collimation of the source also provides enhanced spectroscopic and diffraction resolution that gives more insight into molecular, extended and supramolecular structures. The length scales can be bridged from the atomic up to that of visible light microscopy and buried features within materials can be observed with the appropriate energy. With an increased emphasis on ease of use, such capabilities are open to exploitation for chemical challenges.
x-ray-diffraction, absorption-spectroscopy, synchrotron-radiation, circular-dichroism, atomic-structure, xmas eamline, rh catalysts, light-source, resolution, scattering
1463-9076
3045-3058
Evans, J.
05890433-0155-49fe-a65d-38c90ea25c69
Evans, J.
05890433-0155-49fe-a65d-38c90ea25c69

Evans, J. (2006) Brilliant opportunities across the spectrum. Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 8 (26), 3045-3058. (doi:10.1039/b604369k).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Third generation synchrotron light sources provide stable, tuneable light of energy up to the hard X-ray region. The gain of a trillion in brightness as compared to a conventional laboratory X-ray source transforms the opportunities for establishing structure-function relationships. The light may be quasi-continuous or pulsed, have controllable polarisation and have coherence lengths larger than the sample size. The high brightness provides a basis for adding time and spatial resolution to X-ray scattering and spectroscopy. It may also be used to identify very specific information about the magnetic properties of atoms within materials, element specific vibrations, and local structural descriptions identified with chemical speciation. More demanding scattering and diffraction problems can be solved such as weakly scattering materials, large unit cells and structural entities. The high collimation of the source also provides enhanced spectroscopic and diffraction resolution that gives more insight into molecular, extended and supramolecular structures. The length scales can be bridged from the atomic up to that of visible light microscopy and buried features within materials can be observed with the appropriate energy. With an increased emphasis on ease of use, such capabilities are open to exploitation for chemical challenges.

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More information

Published date: 2006
Keywords: x-ray-diffraction, absorption-spectroscopy, synchrotron-radiation, circular-dichroism, atomic-structure, xmas eamline, rh catalysts, light-source, resolution, scattering

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 44433
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/44433
ISSN: 1463-9076
PURE UUID: 056cc34d-0e4f-4c50-a5ff-04f1c6764128

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Mar 2007
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 21:07

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