The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Disturbance, dispersal and marine assemblage structure: A case study from the nearshore Southern Ocean

Disturbance, dispersal and marine assemblage structure: A case study from the nearshore Southern Ocean
Disturbance, dispersal and marine assemblage structure: A case study from the nearshore Southern Ocean
Disturbance is a key factor in most natural environments and, globally, disturbance regimes are changing, driven by increased anthropogenic influences, including climate change. There is, however, still a lack of understanding about how disturbance interacts with species dispersal capacity to shape marine assemblage structure. We examined the impact of ice scour disturbance history (2009–2016) on the nearshore seafloor in a highly disturbed region of the Western Antarctic Peninsula by contrasting the response of two groups with different dispersal capacities: one consisting of high-dispersal species (mobile with pelagic larvae) and one of low-dispersal species (sessile with benthic larvae). Piecewise Structural Equation Models were constructed to test multi-factorial predictions of the underlying mechanisms, based on hypothesised responses to disturbance for the two groups. At least two or three disturbance factors, acting at different spatial scales, drove assemblage composition. A comparison between both high- and low-dispersal models demonstrated that these mechanisms are dispersal dependent. Disturbance should not be treated as a single metric, but should incorporate remote and direct disturbance events with consideration of taxa-dispersal and disturbance legacy. These modelling approaches can provide insights into how disturbance shapes assemblages in other disturbance regimes, such as fire-prone forests and trawl fisheries.
Antarctica, Assemblage structure, Benthos, Dispersal, Disturbance, Ice scour
0141-1136
Robinson, Ben J.o.
ed96f813-5d4f-44f8-9ebe-bc1fe0f0eb60
Barnes, David K.a.
4e32233e-f977-48d4-93ec-5e4ac1f73e91
Morley, Simon A.
d70e9c32-531e-4d8a-a643-ec2a674ef624
Robinson, Ben J.o.
ed96f813-5d4f-44f8-9ebe-bc1fe0f0eb60
Barnes, David K.a.
4e32233e-f977-48d4-93ec-5e4ac1f73e91
Morley, Simon A.
d70e9c32-531e-4d8a-a643-ec2a674ef624

Robinson, Ben J.o., Barnes, David K.a. and Morley, Simon A. (2020) Disturbance, dispersal and marine assemblage structure: A case study from the nearshore Southern Ocean. Marine Environmental Research, 160, [105025]. (doi:10.1016/j.marenvres.2020.105025).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Disturbance is a key factor in most natural environments and, globally, disturbance regimes are changing, driven by increased anthropogenic influences, including climate change. There is, however, still a lack of understanding about how disturbance interacts with species dispersal capacity to shape marine assemblage structure. We examined the impact of ice scour disturbance history (2009–2016) on the nearshore seafloor in a highly disturbed region of the Western Antarctic Peninsula by contrasting the response of two groups with different dispersal capacities: one consisting of high-dispersal species (mobile with pelagic larvae) and one of low-dispersal species (sessile with benthic larvae). Piecewise Structural Equation Models were constructed to test multi-factorial predictions of the underlying mechanisms, based on hypothesised responses to disturbance for the two groups. At least two or three disturbance factors, acting at different spatial scales, drove assemblage composition. A comparison between both high- and low-dispersal models demonstrated that these mechanisms are dispersal dependent. Disturbance should not be treated as a single metric, but should incorporate remote and direct disturbance events with consideration of taxa-dispersal and disturbance legacy. These modelling approaches can provide insights into how disturbance shapes assemblages in other disturbance regimes, such as fire-prone forests and trawl fisheries.

Text
1-s2.0-S0141113620302294-main - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (864kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 19 May 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 25 May 2020
Published date: 1 September 2020
Keywords: Antarctica, Assemblage structure, Benthos, Dispersal, Disturbance, Ice scour

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 444422
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/444422
ISSN: 0141-1136
PURE UUID: 31d7903f-ce9e-4716-ba2c-4db7d15c60fd

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Oct 2020 16:31
Last modified: 25 Nov 2021 22:19

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: David K.a. Barnes
Author: Simon A. Morley

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×