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Fungal transformation of selenium and tellurium located in a volcanogenic sulfide deposit

Fungal transformation of selenium and tellurium located in a volcanogenic sulfide deposit
Fungal transformation of selenium and tellurium located in a volcanogenic sulfide deposit
Microbial reduction of soluble selenium (Se) or tellurium (Te) species results in immobilization as elemental forms and this process has been employed in soil bioremediation. However, little is known of direct and indirect fungal interactions with Se‐/Te‐bearing ores. In this research, the ability of Phoma glomerata to effect transformation of selenite and tellurite was investigated including interaction with Se and Te present in sulfide ores from the Kisgruva Proterozoic volcanogenic deposit. Phoma glomerata could precipitate elemental Se and Te as nanoparticles, intracellularly and extracellularly, when grown with selenite or tellurite. The nanoparticles possessed various surface capping molecules, with formation being influenced by extracellular polymeric substances. The presence of sulfide ore also affected the production of exopolysaccharide and protein. Although differences were undetectable in gross Se and Te ore levels before and after fungal interaction using X‐ray fluorescence, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry of polished flat ore surfaces revealed that P. glomerata could effect changes in Se/Te distribution and concentration indicating Se/Te enrichment in the biomass. These findings provide further understanding of fungal roles in metalloid transformations and are relevant to the geomicrobiology of environmental metalloid cycling as well as informing applied approaches for Se and Te immobilization, biorecovery or bioremediation.
1462-2912
2346-2364
Liang, Xinjin
c876d7f1-dc9a-435a-b269-a1b2e2168113
Perez, Magali Aude Marie‐jeanne
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Zhang, Shuai
c4b93aeb-c546-464e-96e1-500240f96cc6
Song, Wenjuan
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Armstrong, Joseph Graham
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Bullock, Liam Adam
c6ffb9b0-0a54-4ab2-9edb-f97280e6ce2d
Feldmann, Jörg
fdcab8a2-8bdb-426f-b577-a73ae086497b
Parnell, John
b86302b0-b930-4b7c-9786-13abc612fef7
Csetenyi, Laszlo
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Gadd, Geoffrey Michael
661b70c2-3e5f-44b6-993a-f0b880f88d3f
Liang, Xinjin
c876d7f1-dc9a-435a-b269-a1b2e2168113
Perez, Magali Aude Marie‐jeanne
01e7e5f3-d585-4162-a4fd-acc3ecfcf060
Zhang, Shuai
c4b93aeb-c546-464e-96e1-500240f96cc6
Song, Wenjuan
343428d2-c4fe-4cd7-987b-41532bcd6066
Armstrong, Joseph Graham
6c575050-edad-4ec3-812a-0d4578491753
Bullock, Liam Adam
c6ffb9b0-0a54-4ab2-9edb-f97280e6ce2d
Feldmann, Jörg
fdcab8a2-8bdb-426f-b577-a73ae086497b
Parnell, John
b86302b0-b930-4b7c-9786-13abc612fef7
Csetenyi, Laszlo
144983f9-8371-4e3f-8e28-672e8b8315d1
Gadd, Geoffrey Michael
661b70c2-3e5f-44b6-993a-f0b880f88d3f

Liang, Xinjin, Perez, Magali Aude Marie‐jeanne, Zhang, Shuai, Song, Wenjuan, Armstrong, Joseph Graham, Bullock, Liam Adam, Feldmann, Jörg, Parnell, John, Csetenyi, Laszlo and Gadd, Geoffrey Michael (2020) Fungal transformation of selenium and tellurium located in a volcanogenic sulfide deposit. Environmental Microbiology, 22 (6), 2346-2364. (doi:10.1111/emi.v22.6).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Microbial reduction of soluble selenium (Se) or tellurium (Te) species results in immobilization as elemental forms and this process has been employed in soil bioremediation. However, little is known of direct and indirect fungal interactions with Se‐/Te‐bearing ores. In this research, the ability of Phoma glomerata to effect transformation of selenite and tellurite was investigated including interaction with Se and Te present in sulfide ores from the Kisgruva Proterozoic volcanogenic deposit. Phoma glomerata could precipitate elemental Se and Te as nanoparticles, intracellularly and extracellularly, when grown with selenite or tellurite. The nanoparticles possessed various surface capping molecules, with formation being influenced by extracellular polymeric substances. The presence of sulfide ore also affected the production of exopolysaccharide and protein. Although differences were undetectable in gross Se and Te ore levels before and after fungal interaction using X‐ray fluorescence, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry of polished flat ore surfaces revealed that P. glomerata could effect changes in Se/Te distribution and concentration indicating Se/Te enrichment in the biomass. These findings provide further understanding of fungal roles in metalloid transformations and are relevant to the geomicrobiology of environmental metalloid cycling as well as informing applied approaches for Se and Te immobilization, biorecovery or bioremediation.

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1462-2920.15012 - Version of Record
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Accepted/In Press date: 1 April 2020
Published date: 1 June 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 444438
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/444438
ISSN: 1462-2912
PURE UUID: 1f74a725-e176-42f6-a39c-c0f30b8a8495

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Date deposited: 19 Oct 2020 16:33
Last modified: 25 Nov 2021 20:04

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Contributors

Author: Xinjin Liang
Author: Magali Aude Marie‐jeanne Perez
Author: Shuai Zhang
Author: Wenjuan Song
Author: Joseph Graham Armstrong
Author: Liam Adam Bullock
Author: Jörg Feldmann
Author: John Parnell
Author: Laszlo Csetenyi
Author: Geoffrey Michael Gadd

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