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Feasibility of using strength measures, including peak inspiratory flow, for routine monitoring in case management patients aged 65 and over

Feasibility of using strength measures, including peak inspiratory flow, for routine monitoring in case management patients aged 65 and over
Feasibility of using strength measures, including peak inspiratory flow, for routine monitoring in case management patients aged 65 and over
Peak inspiratory flow (PIF) is a portable, relatively new method for measuring respiratory function and indirect muscle strength; the feasibility of its routine clinical measurement is unknown. To investigate the acceptability, reliability and short-term stability of PIF, alongside the established measures of peak expiratory flow (PEF) and grip strength in community dwelling case management patients. Patients were tested in a sitting position, initially on two occasions, one week apart; seven patients having repeated measures taken on a further four occasions over a seven-week period. The best of three attempts for all measures were recorded. Reliability was tested using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), standard error of measurement (SEM), minimal detectable change (MDC) and Bland–Altman analysis. Eight patients aged 69–91 years (mean age 81.5 ± 7.7 years; 5 males) participated. For between-day reliability using the first two time points, one week apart the ICCs (3,1) were 0.97, 0.98 and 0.99 for PIF, PEF and grip strength respectively; using all five time points resulted in ICCs of 0.92, 0.99 and 0.99 respectively. Bland–Altman plots also illustrated a good level of agreement across days. Feedback on the acceptability of the measures was gathered from patients. PIF, PEF and grip strength showed excellent reliability and acceptability. Whilst excellent reliability was observed over the seven-week period, the occurrence of clinically significant symptoms and adverse events in the presence of unchanging PIF, PEF and grip strength, suggests that the measures may not be suitable to identify patients with multiple health conditions entering a period of acute decline.
Acceptability, Feasibility, Grip strength, Peak expiratory flow, Peak inspiratory flow, Reliability
2308-3417
Barnes, Nicola
4ec5f15a-362a-459c-8b50-f6b15aa94081
Walsh, Bronagh
5818243e-048d-4b4b-88c5-231b0e419427
Samuel, Dinesh
03b00738-9b9c-4c0a-a85a-cf43fc0932fc
Barnes, Nicola
4ec5f15a-362a-459c-8b50-f6b15aa94081
Walsh, Bronagh
5818243e-048d-4b4b-88c5-231b0e419427
Samuel, Dinesh
03b00738-9b9c-4c0a-a85a-cf43fc0932fc

Barnes, Nicola, Walsh, Bronagh and Samuel, Dinesh (2020) Feasibility of using strength measures, including peak inspiratory flow, for routine monitoring in case management patients aged 65 and over. Geriatrics, 5 (3), [59]. (doi:10.3390/geriatrics5030059).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Peak inspiratory flow (PIF) is a portable, relatively new method for measuring respiratory function and indirect muscle strength; the feasibility of its routine clinical measurement is unknown. To investigate the acceptability, reliability and short-term stability of PIF, alongside the established measures of peak expiratory flow (PEF) and grip strength in community dwelling case management patients. Patients were tested in a sitting position, initially on two occasions, one week apart; seven patients having repeated measures taken on a further four occasions over a seven-week period. The best of three attempts for all measures were recorded. Reliability was tested using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), standard error of measurement (SEM), minimal detectable change (MDC) and Bland–Altman analysis. Eight patients aged 69–91 years (mean age 81.5 ± 7.7 years; 5 males) participated. For between-day reliability using the first two time points, one week apart the ICCs (3,1) were 0.97, 0.98 and 0.99 for PIF, PEF and grip strength respectively; using all five time points resulted in ICCs of 0.92, 0.99 and 0.99 respectively. Bland–Altman plots also illustrated a good level of agreement across days. Feedback on the acceptability of the measures was gathered from patients. PIF, PEF and grip strength showed excellent reliability and acceptability. Whilst excellent reliability was observed over the seven-week period, the occurrence of clinically significant symptoms and adverse events in the presence of unchanging PIF, PEF and grip strength, suggests that the measures may not be suitable to identify patients with multiple health conditions entering a period of acute decline.

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Feasibility of using strength measures, including peak inspiratory flow, for routine monitoring in case management patients aged 65 and over - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 16 September 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 21 September 2020
Published date: 21 September 2020
Additional Information: Funding Information: We would like to thank study participants. Publisher Copyright: © 2020 by the authors.
Keywords: Acceptability, Feasibility, Grip strength, Peak expiratory flow, Peak inspiratory flow, Reliability

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 444529
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/444529
ISSN: 2308-3417
PURE UUID: 90e6d77e-2abd-479b-8823-de52c0cd9934
ORCID for Bronagh Walsh: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1008-0545

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Oct 2020 16:30
Last modified: 22 Oct 2022 01:35

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Contributors

Author: Nicola Barnes
Author: Bronagh Walsh ORCID iD
Author: Dinesh Samuel

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